harte Show full post »
78buckshot
Thank you.
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Peddler
It is unusual that all the loops of the transformer are so low to me.  Does your meter scale automatically, I'm wondering if your meter is going to kilo ohms or mega ohms.  I'll try to check against  new transformer.
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78buckshot
Peddler, the secondary windings in his transformer look pretty close to specs, the primary side was reading 1.1 ohms and specs call for 38.5, I think the primary side took a hit or over loaded when his charger gave up the ghost. So I think with low resistance it's like a dead short and taking out N1/N2.
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harte
I'm using the 00.0 ohm scale. It won't switch to Kilo or mega ohms on this special setting. With this meter setting there is also an audible tone that sounds when there is a dead short. It sounded off when across the primary of the transformer. 
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grsthegreat
another reason i love the current controllers over the older systems with all the separate repair parts. i have transformers and charging boards in stock, but hate the hunt and peck issues with tracing down charging issues. I have found older generator unit experiencing transitory charging issues that were very hard and expensive to repair. time involved in testing separate devices, time swapping out different components to fix problem only to see issue flair up again. people think a new controller is expensive, but it usually fixes all the non mechanical engine issues with a generator. all the separate parts that make up the older units are also pretty expensive, especially when it doesnt fix the issue.

over the past 4-5 years ive noticed very few issues with the controllers. they seem to have found their sweet spot in reliability.
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harte
Hi Buckshot, and everyone else.
 Well, my new transformer arrived today.
Here's how it went: the first thing I did was check the voltage on the battery, because I had time to charge it if needed. It was at 12.6 volts, but I took it out anyway, and charged it while I was working on the transformer installation.
 Then I unpackaged my bright shiny new transformer, and did some resistance checks on it. They were perfect as to the numbers Buckshot supplied me. 38.5 ohms across the primary, and across the other two sets were on the money too. So, with the fuses out, I went out and installed the transformer.
 I'm old and slow, so by now, the battery was charged up to 13.0 volts, and I called that good enough, and reinstalled it.
 Switched the generator breakers on, and it was time to head inside to the transfer switch.
 I checked for continuity across two of my also, bright shiny new fuses, and they both were good. With the power live this time, I plugged each one of them in. So far so good, I didn't get shocked!
 Now the moment of truth. I had my meter with me, so it was time to check for 220 volts across N1-N2. Switched my meter to AC, probed N1-N2, and...……… To be continued!  
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harte
And..... SUCCESS!

241 volts at N1-N2! Went outside to the generator, and tried the weekly exerciser. Set switch to auto, pushed and held the set switch, fired right up! Most important thing, it shut off right at 12 minutes! I've got the big ole green LED that says "System Set"! That was the mission fellas. 
I'm happy as a lark! 
 Thanks to all that shared their knowledge to help me fix this thing, especially you Buckshot!
 Until the next time, See ya!
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78buckshot
Who-hoo!!, gotta love it when it all comes together. Ain't this new-fangled long distance typewriter the cat's meow? Please give a BIG thanks to Geoff Z. at Ziller Electric for continuing this forum even in hard times. Happy to help, be safe, GOD bless.
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harte
Geoff Z, thank you, thank you, thank you! Couldn't have done it without your boys!
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