Thesandman
I'm about to purchase an 11kw generac for natural gas setup.  Unfortunately the installation location will require a 100 foot run of cable to the service panel.  Would the generac 7-11kw cable with 8awg copper be insufficient given the long run (i.e. will voltage loss be to great?).
When checking with the local electrical inspector if the generac cable would pass inspection, not only did he say he would pass it, but that I could save money but using standard UF cables.  Does anyone do this or do most use the generac cable unless required to run in conduit?
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Birken Vogt
That calculates out to 3% voltage drop at max load.  Very acceptable if it really is only 100'.  Also voltage drop will be much lower if you are running anything less than the full 10/11 kw.  As to the UF vs Cablemaster you will have to see how that pencils out.  Pulling UF through conduit underground is a real pain though.  We don't direct bury anything, too much chance for future damage.
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Cobranut
Birkin,

Around here the power company direct buries the feeders to the house, and those typically last for lifetimes.
The feeders to my shop, garage, and storage buildings are all direct buried, and have been for decades.
The only time I've had trouble with any of them was due to a backhoe, and PVC conduit likely would have made little difference, other than making the repair even more difficult.
I ran conduit for my control cables, but for the 4/0 power feed from my genset I direct buried it as well.
It was tough enough getting that stuff through the conduit at each end, I can't imagine pulling it through over 100' of conduit as well.
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ZZZRSC
If you don't need the six 18 Ga. control wires, then you might save 50% by going with direct burial UF-B copper or XHHW aluminum cable.  The newer aluminum alloys and insulation that came out 15 years? ago are actually outperforming copper, contrary to what many people think. 
    You will gain a shallower trench with conduit, but additional labor and materials. If you choose to use direct bury, it must be 24" deep, if you use pvc conduit, it must be 18", RMC or IMC metallic conduit at 6" deep, deep for a residential location.  EMT is not allowed.
    Generac cable has three #8 copper, current carrying conductors and one #10 ground, in addition to the control wires.  For 100 feet, that is around 3% VD at full 45 amp load, with unity power factor. If you use aluminum, you need to go with #6 Ga. 
    No matter what you use, you must have 3 current carrying conductors and one ground conductor to meet NEC requirements.  Also, we always use 3" wide non-detectable plastic warning tape that states "WARNING BURIED ELECTRIC LINE BELOW" about 5" below the surface, for the full length of the trench.  It is very inexpensive.  You don't need to pay extra for the detectable tape as that is made for water, sewer, and data lines that have no metal in them for the locator to pick up on. 
    One study found that almost 90% of all electrical distribution failures were due to ice, squirrels, birds, tree limbs, and damage to poles; while underground cables and conduits mainly failed when persons neglected to call the free Utility Locating Services due to ignorance or laziness. There will be a day when there are no more overhead lines (I hope).  Orlando Disney World was built that way in 1971, I believe.
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Thesandman
Thanks for the replies everyone.  Given I will need the control wires, I will go with the general cable tray.  +/- on the conduit, though will likely go with conduit to prevent any concerns from the electrical inspector.  The generator is going to be about 2' from the house, so super short underground run
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murphy
Generator needs to be 5 feet from any opening (windows, doors, etc.) in the wall of the house.
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Thesandman
Hi Murphy, thanks for the post.  The planned location is more than 5' from any opening.  Out of curiosity,i would picture windows (those that don't open) don't count? I don't have any picture windows near by, but am curious 
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murphy
A window that can't be opened doesn't count.  The reason for the rule is to keep carbon monoxide from getting into the house.
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