Gray
I have a 16/17kw Honeywell/Generac with the GT-990 engine. It is on NG, with the 200 Amp Honeywell/Generac automatic transfer switch.

I have a 50 amp RV receptacle at my residence, wired through the appropriate breaker in the one and only electrical panel for the residence.

I have two 2200W generators that have the parallel capable system.

Here is the question:

If, in the event of failure of the Honeywell generator, I pulled the breaker located on the Honeywell, removed the blade fuse on the Honeywell generator control panel, and manually threw the transfer switch (disconnecting and isolating the house from utility power)

Could I:

Plug the paralleled small generators into the RV outlet and feed the house?

If, so, would this damage any of the Honeywell/Generac components?
Quote
Cobranut
That would probably work until the utility power came back on, the transfer switch flips back to utility, and your portable generators battle it out with the 1,100,000,000 watt generator at your nearest nuclear power plant.
Hint: Your generators will lose, and probably erupt into pretty impressive fireballs. 😱
Quote
Peddler
Your RV generators that you are paralleling are they 240 volt?  My guess they are 120 volt and will not run the house. 
Quote
Birken Vogt
You need to wire another transfer switch and dedicated inlet connector for this purpose.  Done at cell sites around here all the time in case their main generator breaks down.  But backfeed is backfeed, don't do it at any time.
Quote
Gray
Cobranut wrote:

Hint: Your generators will lose, and probably erupt into pretty impressive fireballs. 😱


Not a subtle point that you are making. Got it; trying to avoid being "that guy".
Quote
Gray
Peddler wrote:
Your RV generators that you are paralleling are they 240 volt?  My guess they are 120 volt and will not run the house. 


Correct re. 120v. Total of 3600 running (2400starting/1800 running each). Intent is for backup to the backup, just for reefers, lights, etc
Quote
Gray
Birken Vogt wrote:
You need to wire another transfer switch and dedicated inlet connector for this purpose.  Done at cell sites around here all the time in case their main generator breaks down.  But backfeed is backfeed, don't do it at any time.


Regarding an additional tfer switch (and dedicated inlet), I am trying to understand this in light of Cobranuts' fireballs (above). 

1. Am I thinking correctly that this could not be a smaller manual tfer switch  (I am thinking of something like the Reliance Control Pro/Tran2 306CRK      http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?306CRK)  because of what Cobranuts said above about the power coming back on and the primary auto transfer switch flipping back to utility power?

2. If the above equipment would work, where would my electrician wire this so as to not conflict with the existing Honeywell/Generac auto tfer switch?
Quote
Cobranut
A manual x-fer switch with it's own sub-panel feeding just the circuits you deem critical could be added, and wouldn't interfere with the whole house transfer switch at all.
If all these circuits are 120v, you're portable units should work fine, up to their capacity, and would easily protect a couple refrigerators/freezers, and run enough lights and other small appliances to get by.
I'd strongly advise you to seek the advice of a qualified electrician, as it will have to be wired correctly to ensure everything works safely.
Unless you need power for medical equipment though, you may find that the cost of the needed equipment and labor may be more than it's worth, vs. a good maintenance and test regime on your existing generator to make sure it's always ready to run.
Quote
Peddler
Those inverter generators are ok for camping, electronics and lighting but anything with a high inrush will take out the generator unless it is grossly oversized.  Where a normal generator can usually surge 150% of rated power to deal with inrush the inverters can't do it no matter what they say.  You would need to have an inverter generator which had a continuous output equal to the total surge of your system to survive. 
Quote
Gray
Cobranut wrote:
A manual x-fer switch with it's own sub-panel feeding just the circuits you deem critical could be added, and wouldn't interfere with the whole house transfer switch at all.
If all these circuits are 120v, you're portable units should work fine, up to their capacity, and would easily protect a couple refrigerators/freezers, and run enough lights and other small appliances to get by.
I'd strongly advise you to seek the advice of a qualified electrician, as it will have to be wired correctly to ensure everything works safely.
Unless you need power for medical equipment though, you may find that the cost of the needed equipment and labor may be more than it's worth, vs. a good maintenance and test regime on your existing generator to make sure it's always ready to run.


Yes sir, I do not perform electrical work of this nature; I might install a simple wall switch or receptacle, but I hire professionals for this level of work. My questions are simply for my understanding, not for DIY activities. 

All of the intended circuits would be 120v. I perform all of the maintenance on the existing unit with assiduous detail; you really could eat from it. New oil and filter (with magnet attached to filter) annually even though it only has about 28 hours on it and it is just now approaching 4 years old. I adjusted the valves per specification at the 24-25 hour mark, and I also increased the monthly exercise time to 25 minutes because I was seeing some "oil pudding" on the fill cap. That has stopped since increasing the exercise time.

This potential project is just an attempt to bridge a potential issue:

The problem that I have is that there are zero Generac authorized servicing dealers anywhere near us; plenty of sales and installation dealers, but no service dealers, and none who are willing to come from any distance. (I discovered that anomaly AFTER purchasing the ten year extended warranty. In my own naivete and ignorance, I did not imagine that a dealership that sells and installs units would not service them.) I contacted Generac and they said words to the effect that in the event of a unit failure, they would "find" a way to provide service. That did not leave me with a overwhelming feeling of confidence that during such a failure event that the process would be easy and convenient.
Quote
Gray
Peddler wrote:
Those inverter generators are ok for camping, electronics and lighting but anything with a high inrush will take out the generator unless it is grossly oversized.  Where a normal generator can usually surge 150% of rated power to deal with inrush the inverters can't do it no matter what they say.  You would need to have an inverter generator which had a continuous output equal to the total surge of your system to survive. 


The loads that would be fed by these are lighting and appliances (reefer, freezer, clothes washer, etc). Our lighting is 100% LED, and our appliances are all modern inverter style systems. (Theses appliances, the reefer, for example, is similar to one that we use in our RV; a Samsung.) We regularly power our RV (which has residential inverter style reefer and laundry appliances) with these generators, with enough power to also operate a non-inverter 15k BTU A/C. They handle the loads with no problem and just purr contentedly. 
Quote
JayH
Given the cost and hassle involved in wiring a second transfer switch, and that this is a "backup for the backup", and that it's only to run a refrigerator and a few lights, personally I'd just buy a few heavy-duty extension cords and keep them available. When needed, plug the critical loads into the portables with the cords. No possibility of backfeed and no need for an electrician.
Quote