bronco
use it will keep plugs from sitcking in the theads
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zagami
Just purchased a Generac 5875 20kw air-cool a few months ago. Have been told by some Generac owners to apply anti-sieze compound to the spark plug threads. Some say it is needed to prevent problems, when removing the spark plugs each year. Others have stated that it is not needed, and not to use any compound on the threads. Generator has worked perfect, except for a rough idle on Quiet Mode a couple of times. Need some advice from the forum!
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Skip Douglas SkipD
I always use a little high-temperature anti-seize on spark plug threads when they go into an aluminum head.
Skip Douglas
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genme
+1
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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78buckshot
The rough running in low speed exercise is due to a faulty choke or air box, have your tech replace it under warranty. If your in a northern climate I suggest not using the quiet mode, I have found several units with condensation in the oil due to not warming the engine enough to boil the water out. I have changed them to high speed exercise and within two normal oil changes the oil is no longer milky. The rough running will also be eliminated in high speed.
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douglas123
Personally I like a little anti-sieze on the threads. two disimilar metals, hot and cold weather. Snow , freezing and moisture. Does not take much to pull the threads out on an aluminum cylinder head. Had a 1994 1.2 Nissan with corrodded spark plugs. Took about two hours to gently remove 4 spark plugs. could have serviced the whole system and been on the road to another job. Just anothers days work. I always run the spark plugs in finger tight to check the thread condition. BUBBA TIGHT does not work in this instance.
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Scotty306134
I've learned to use 'never seize' on all screws, bolts and nuts on assembly. It makes later disassembly significantly easier. Same goes with sparkplugs!
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Scotty306134;11557 wrote:
I've learned to use 'never seize' on all screws, bolts and nuts on assembly. It makes later disassembly significantly easier. Same goes with sparkplugs!
That practice is not necessarily a good thing to do in all cases. You need to be aware of any special instructions for fasteners in some cases.
Skip Douglas
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MacMan
We use high temp Anti-seize on ALL the spark plugs on our $40K sprint car engines (aluminum heads).....recommended by engine builder to prevent galling of threads, and makes removal much easier.
On the generator engine, apply a very small dab, and spread it around the threads...all you want is a very thin coating.
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genme
Is anti-seize applied on the original spark plugs from the factory? If not, would you suggest (new) owners with the original plugs remove the plugs, apply the anti-seize, and then replace them?
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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Skip Douglas SkipD
genme;11586 wrote:
Is anti-seize applied on the original spark plugs from the factory? If not, would you suggest (new) owners with the original plugs remove the plugs, apply the anti-seize, and then replace them?
I generally do that if the head(s) are made of aluminum.
Skip Douglas
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MacMan
genme;11586 wrote:
Is anti-seize applied on the original spark plugs from the factory? If not, would you suggest (new) owners with the original plugs remove the plugs, apply the anti-seize, and then replace them?


On aluminum head engines, I would say yes. I did it on my passenger car too (has alum. head).
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HKFever
genme;11586 wrote:
Is anti-seize applied on the original spark plugs from the factory? If not, would you suggest (new) owners with the original plugs remove the plugs, apply the anti-seize, and then replace them?


Anti-Seize on spark plugs and most bolts is a great way to prevent galling and to enable easy removal when the time comes. With a lot of anti-seize rated to 3000F I doubt if we will reach its working limits.
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