Canada_Guy
There is lots of good practical knowledge here, so I'll throw this question out.

My house is 8-years old. I'm thinking that the electric hot water tank and pump pressure tank are reaching end of life.

I was wondering if it would be a good idea to replace both tanks in the next year or so. I believe 10-years is average life for a hot water tank.

It's in a finished basement and has a pan under the hot water tank, but if it had a spraying leak, the pan may not help.

Just curious on what you guys think.
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UPS
Have you ever checked or replaced the anode rod in the water heater?
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Birken Vogt
Water heaters do not generally spray when they leak.

I have seen many (most?) go way, way longer than that 7-10 year figure.

I would make sure the pan and drain are in good condition, replace the anode, and check back in another 10 years....
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MEC
Don't know what your water is like, but have you replaced the elements many times in the past? It should give you an idea of what condition your tank is in.
I agree in that with a finished basement you really need a catch pan for washers and water heaters. A water sensor installed around these would be a good early warning.

We have one town here that is all on private wells and the water eats through the elements like crazy.
They are just now in the process of providing town water to all the houses, which is a huge undertaking.
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Canada_Guy
Thanks for the thoughts.

No, I haven't checked the anode, or had to replace any elements.

I'm on a well here (my own well), and I have a softener. I typically don't see mineral build up around the sink taps.

I haven't routinely opened the bottom drain to flush out the tank. I just did it now and the flow out the bottom drain tap is low. This leads me to believe I have a build up in the bottom.

I do have a water alarm near the hot water tank. It sounds an alarm and shuts off the water to the house.

I think I'll pull the anode, one of the elements and the drain tap. Do an inspection. If all looks good, leave for a few more years. If the anode is gone and the elements all corroded, I'll opt for a new tank sooner rather than later.

Thanks again for the input.
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Jack Hottel
Replaced the anodes in my 2 gas fired water heaters last year, since gasses were coming out with the hot water. Both units installed in 1992.
Water heater in my former house was installed in 1974, no issues to date.
Water heater in my earlier house was installed in 1996, replacing one installed in 1965. No issues to date.
Well water in all houses, no softening or filtering. I am disappointed if I don't get 30 years out of a heater tank.
Jack Hottel
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UPS
As long as the anode rod stays reasonably intact, and is replaced if needed, a water heater will usually be OK for years. If the anode corrodes to where there is little left, any weakness or pinhole in the glass liner is no longer protected. Water cold actually spray from a spot that corrodes through, but the insulation and outer shell will turn that into a drip at the bottom
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Namvet34
Canada_Guy;35246 wrote:

I haven't routinely opened the bottom drain to flush out the tank. I just did it now and the flow out the bottom drain tap is low. This leads me to believe I have a build up in the bottom.


.

You may also try closing the cold water inlet to your water heater, then open your water heater’s relief valve while at the same time opening the tank’s drain valve to see if there is any change in the water flow.

Regards,

Gene

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Birken Vogt
I have had good success by de-pressurizing the water tank and then back flowing from a pressurized source INTO the drain to get things cleaned out and moving.
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d11gnccer
We do work for a successful real estate developer and his dad always told him to build a house new and sell when he replaced the first hot water tank. The hot water tank typically is the first to go and everything else major will start to follow... furnace, roof, appliances etc. Replacement of these items are not "worth it". They claim the housing market is all relative. If you sell a house cheap you should be able to buy cheap. Sell high and you will buy high.

Either sell your house or shoot for the 10 year mark if you see no signs that lead you to believe it is failing. Better to do it on your terms than wait. The price of a new tank will only continue to climb.
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