nrp3
Are these still mostly made onsite or is anyone selling these yet? Seeing lots of pics of pressure treated lumber types or poured concrete types. Need 26 inches.
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Cobranut
nrp3;n58602 wrote:
Are these still mostly made onsite or is anyone selling these yet? Seeing lots of pics of pressure treated lumber types or poured concrete types. Need 26 inches.


Someone should've sold those to Fukushima. LOL
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Birken Vogt
nrp3;n58602 wrote:
Are these still mostly made onsite or is anyone selling these yet? Seeing lots of pics of pressure treated lumber types or poured concrete types. Need 26 inches.


I once made one for snow out of square tubing x-braced like a farm fuel tank. It might have been about the same cost to make one out of concrete. I would never use PT lumber because it seems to shrink away from the screw holes and crack at the ends after many years in the sun and rain.
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BrentB
We have a local sheet metal shop fabricate them out of aluminum angle iron. They build any height we need. X bracing depends on height. Tallest to date was 6'6" above grade, with 4' concreted in the ground.
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BMerrill
I work for a municipality as the Floodplain Coordinator.

In the Special Flood Hazard Areas (Floodplain) all mechanical equipment has to protected from a base flood event. This is typically accompanied by elevating the equipment above the regulatory flood protection elevation on a raised platform most often made of treated wood with the post buried in the ground. The equipment has to be anchored to the platform. mechanical equipment includes but are not limited to HVAC equipment, water softener units, bath/kitchen fixtures, duct work, electric meter panels/boxes, utility/cable boxes, appliances (i.e., washers, dryers, refrigerator and the like), hot water heaters, electric outlets/switches.

Have also seen platforms made from steel channel/tubing, brick or block enclosure backfilled and topped with concrete, or cantilevered from the building for HVAC condenser.

The regulatory flood protection elevation[FONT=arial] is the base flood elevation plus any freeboard requirement established by ordinance or the local building code of the community having jurisdiction. [/FONT]The AHJ should require an elevation certificate prepared by a licensed Surveyor to document the mechanical equipment elevation.
[FONT=arial]Do your customer a favor. At a minimum, the top of the platform [/FONT]should be at or above the finished floor elevation. Flood insurance premiums are rated on the elevation of the lowest floor and mechanical as compared to the base flood elevation.

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BrentB
And after all those steps, flood insurance wouldn't pay out on generators that didn't have three walls and a roof connected to the house!!!!
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BMerrill
The standby generator and transfer switch must be listed as a major appliance on your flood insurance quote to be covered by flood insurance. As an installer you should inform your customer in the floodplain to contact their insurance carrier and add the generator and transfer switch to their flood insurance policy.
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nrp3
Interesting.
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BrentB
BMerrill;n58621 wrote:
The standby generator and transfer switch must be listed as a major appliance on your flood insurance quote to be covered by flood insurance. As an installer you should inform your customer in the floodplain to contact their insurance carrier and add the generator and transfer switch to their flood insurance policy.


Has to have three walls and a roof attached to the structure to count as " permanently installed!" or they don't cover it!
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