Badabing
Anyone ever exerience some small oil/water emulsification in the air filter assy, on a Guardian aircooled unit? Using 5/30 Mobil 1, changed per schedule.
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78buckshot
Welcome to the forum. I see a little oil in the air filter box on most of the units I service, no different than any other internal combustion engine. If your generator doesn't see much run time you may have condensation in the oil, especially if your unit is exercising in "Quiet Mode". If this is the case I suggest setting it on high speed exercise or run it under load more often.
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HKFever
78buckshot;11949 wrote:
Welcome to the forum. I see a little oil in the air filter box on most of the units I service, no different than any other internal combustion engine. If your generator doesn't see much run time you may have condensation in the oil, especially if your unit is exercising in "Quiet Mode". If this is the case I suggest setting it on high speed exercise or run it under load more often.


Do you find that running it for fifteen minutes per week at full rpm is adequate or does it do better if loaded?
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piper18
With any internal combustion engine in the winter, it will develop condensation from the temperature change. The longer and hotter the engine gets when you run it, the better so if you run it under load it will get hotter. I would not run it in quite mode during the winter and watch the oil on the dip stick. If it starts to get milky, its not running long enough.

Bob
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genme
I'm planning to set my exercise time for mid afternoon. With afternoon ambient temperatures, hopefully, being warmer than at other times of the day, I assume this would result in less condensation. Thoughts?
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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78buckshot
I have not seen the condensation problem on the older models that exercise at full speed, I'm in south east Michigan, any of the machines that I service where I find condensation in the oil I switch to high speed. It normally clears up the oil after two regular changes. If the unit see's more run time than just the exercise then the oil stay's free of water.
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Badabing
78buckshot;11949 wrote:
Welcome to the forum. I see a little oil in the air filter box on most of the units I service, no different than any other internal combustion engine. If your generator doesn't see much run time you may have condensation in the oil, especially if your unit is exercising in "Quiet Mode". If this is the case I suggest setting it on high speed exercise or run it under load more often.


Thanks! Yes, just exercising. Older unit, 2001, does not have quiet mode.

What's your thoughts on oil level? I do keep it right to the top of the full mark cross-hatching.
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Badabing
HKFever;11955 wrote:
Do you find that running it for fifteen minutes per week at full rpm is adequate or does it do better if loaded?


Hmmm...that's unknown. I'll have to monitor that, HK!
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piper18
Badabing;11993 wrote:
Thanks! Yes, just exercising. Older unit, 2001, does not have quiet mode.

What's your thoughts on oil level? I do keep it right to the top of the full mark cross-hatching.


I would keep the oil at the top so when you do need to run it for a long time, there is no need to shut it down right away.

Bob
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Badabing
genme;11965 wrote:
I'm planning to set my exercise time for mid afternoon. With afternoon ambient temperatures, hopefully, being warmer than at other times of the day, I assume this would result in less condensation. Thoughts?


Makes sense to me. Might try that myself.
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Dave_eng
Consider a crankcase heater, essentially a magnetic heater stuck to the bottom of the crankcase. Control it with a Thermo Cube or similar temp switch. Search the forum for info on such products.

The condensation is accumulating during the many hours the unit is not running and you have only the exercise time to drive it out of the engine. The ambient temp when exercising (unless excessively cold) is not going to make a big difference in getting rid of the moisture

Dave p.
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78buckshot
How does the magnetic heater work on the aluminum crankcase?, I've only seen the insert type for the Generac air cooled.
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Dave_eng
The engine block is indeed aluminum but it sits on a stamped steel cradle which is supported by the rubber vibration mounts. The magnetic heater is stuck to the steel cradle. The engine block has a large foot where it rests on the steel cradle and it is under this foot that the magnetic heater is located so the heat is conducted thru the steel and into the aluminum of the engine block. I inserted a thermocouple into the dipstick hole to measure the oil temp on very cold days. It was much warmer than the outside air but I have forgotten the exact temps.
FYI the generator is also supported on a steel cradle.
Hope this helps. Ask more ? if necessary.
Dave p
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78buckshot
Thanks for the description Dave, I didn't know the steel mount had that much contact with the crankcase.
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HKFever
Dave_eng;12048 wrote:
The engine block is indeed aluminum but it sits on a stamped steel cradle which is supported by the rubber vibration mounts. [B]The magnetic heater is stuck to the steel cradle[/B]. The engine block has a large foot where it rests on the steel cradle and it is under this foot that the magnetic heater is located so the heat is conducted thru the steel and into the aluminum of the engine block. I inserted a thermocouple into the dipstick hole to measure the oil temp on very cold days. It was much warmer than the outside air but I have forgotten the exact temps.
FYI the generator is also supported on a steel cradle.
Hope this helps. Ask more ? if necessary.
Dave p


That sure is an inefficient way to transfer the heat to the oil. The steel plate would also be a heat sink giving off the heat. Since they design these engines a simple plug to install an insertion heater into the oil sump would do a much better job and require a significantly smaller heating element. On a/c compressors both kinds are used but with the casing being steel (or cast iron using steel clips that use the mounting bolts to support the element against the casing) there is much less loss. How warm do the rubber isolation bushings get?
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