Cirus Show full post »
DanS26
Very interested in what you guys find with lightning strikes.......do most of these lightning hit generators have a rod driven next to them or not?

I removed my rod a couple of years ago based on advice from Mike Holt.  I believe Generac no longer recommends a rod at the generator site.
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Cobranut
I think a ground rod at the generator is prohibited by code.
I have several outbuildings that have 3 wire feeders and ground rods at each building, but those installations were done before the code changed.
My genset has a 4 wire feeder to the transfer switch in accordance with current code, and I feel that is the better way to protect against lightning.
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Cirus
This generator was set next to a power pole about 3' away. The pole took the hit and the xfmr was blown. There was a ground rod at the service and transfer switch which was mounted on the power pole. It may have lessened the damage but it sure didn't stop it. The only time you drive a rod at the generator is when it's a separately derived system which it isn't because your not breaking the neutral in the transfer switch .I've replaced dozens of controllers due to power surges and lighting and Generac has warrantied them all. You have to send in the bad controller to Generac for testing . If it's bad you get paid. If its not and just needs resetting you don't and your out the cost of a new controller. 
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restosud
Cirus wrote:
This generator was set next to a power pole about 3' away. The pole took the hit and the xfmr was blown. There was a ground rod at the service and transfer switch which was mounted on the power pole. It may have lessened the damage but it sure didn't stop it. The only time you drive a rod at the generator is when it's a separately derived system which it isn't because your not breaking the neutral in the transfer switch .I've replaced dozens of controllers due to power surges and lighting and Generac has warrantied them all. You have to send in the bad controller to Generac for testing . If it's bad you get paid. If its not and just needs resetting you don't and your out the cost of a new controller. 


didn't know they could be reset.
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Cirus
restosud wrote:


didn't know they could be reset.
A power surge will sometimes scramble them and they just need resetting. Lightning they are done in some form. This controller had the battery charger knocked out.
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BillM
DanS26 wrote:
Very interested in what you guys find with lightning strikes.......do most of these lightning hit generators have a rod driven next to them or not?

I removed my rod a couple of years ago based on advice from Mike Holt.  I believe Generac no longer recommends a rod at the generator site.


I put a rod next to my generator.  I self installed, and I just couldn't figure out if I should or shouldn't have had one.  The manual, well, the way I interpreted it, I needed one.  But over time, I suspect I don't.
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Cobranut
BillM wrote:


I put a rod next to my generator.  I self installed, and I just couldn't figure out if I should or shouldn't have had one.  The manual, well, the way I interpreted it, I needed one.  But over time, I suspect I don't.


Depends on when you installed and what the code said at the time.  Your inspector shouldn't have approved it if it didn't meet code. 
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MacL
On your magneto replacement, I hope you did not install the #2 (front) magneto backwards.  

Both spark plug wires should exit the magneto toward the rear.  This means that the magneto's spark plug wire on the front has to do a u-turn before exiting the engine's cowling.  That's why that wire is longer.

I've seen so many people (technicians even) that think it is better installed the other way, but it would be incorrect and the unit will not run right if you flip the magneto.  I've gone back into to two units to properly install the #2 (front) magneto.  It matters that much.
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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JayH
restosud wrote:


didn't know they could be reset.


Essentially that means rebooting. They're computers and can get stuck in a non-functional state, especially after a nearby lightning strike which is essentially an EMP. A "watchdog" timer in software *should* automatically reboot the controller if it gets stuck, but a hard reboot is sometimes needed.

Remove ALL power to the controller then re-apply. Disconnect battery, 7.5 amp fuse, and the T1 terminal feeding the charger. Then reconnect.
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