Dormank
My Centurian model 4692-0 (8.5kW) died and I am trying to install a new Generac model 5882 - 8kW in its place and hook it up to the existing transfer switch that was prepackaged as a 12 circuit 100 amp transfer switch and marked "T/Switch/Load Center # 0E0225." I noticed that the new manual refers to needing a T1 wire and a possible 0 wire. I have 4 heavy guage and 4 ligher guage wires going to the generator from the old hookup in a singled metal shielded bundle transitioning to non-metal on the outside. For the lighter guage this covers N1, N2, 23 and 194. I am worried that another wire may need to be run but really want to void this if possible. I also need to ensure that the battery is charged and maintained well.

I noticed some discussion about the T1 wire in a thread identified as "Wiring for a model 5875," but this left me more confused. I believe that my Centurian hookup charged the batter so why the issue? What should I do about the T1 wire?
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ohmslaw
You will need the T1 wire to power the charger.
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Dormank
Is there anyway to avoid running a new wire? I see that there is a bulletin to add a 5A fuse so why can't I add this fuse inside the generator? there must be a connection to pick up the 120V?
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Dormank
[U]Clarification[/U]: The bulletin (PIB10-08-WAC) I believe deals with adding a fuse inside the Transfer Switch. It says "To make RTSN and RTSE compatible with 2010 Air-cooled HSB control system to provide a 120 VAC power source for battery charge"... however, still wondering why the old charger in the generator got it's source from the 8 total wires and if this is just a matter of adding a fuse why can't I add it in the generator?
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ohmslaw
Old unit charged the battery from windings in the alternator during an outage. New unit only charges from the load side of the switch. you need to add a fuse in the switch powered from the load side and add the fifth wire or go solar.
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Canada_Guy
There have been posts here where people have run a backed-up power circuit from a breaker in the transfer panel to the generator housing to install an AC outlet inside near the battery. Then plug in a battery charger/minder connected to the battery. This may eliminate the need to run the extra wire (T1?) in the existing conduit.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Canada_Guy;7732 wrote:
There have been posts here where people have run a backed-up power circuit from a breaker in the transfer panel to the generator housing to install an AC outlet inside near the battery. Then plug in a battery charger/minder connected to the battery. This may eliminate the need to run the extra wire (T1?) in the existing conduit.
I'm one of the folks who have done this, and it requires a separate branch circuit wire set to do it properly.
Skip Douglas
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Dormank
First, let me say thanks to everyone for your thoughts. Now if I need to run some wires around 30+ feet.... and never ever want to do it again ... and be able to switch 5 years from now to another generator or even another brand of generator; how many should I run. One did I hear 18 guage for the T1, how about the 0 wire, a separate AC line for a battery heater....?
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Dormank;7734 wrote:
First, let me say thanks to everyone for your thoughts. Now if I need to run some wires around 30+ feet.... and never ever want to do it again ... and be able to switch 5 years from now to another generator or even another brand of generator; how many should I run. One did I hear 18 guage for the T1, how about the 0 wire, a separate AC line for a battery heater....?
Doing my setup was rather easy, as I ran conduit all the way from the generator to the transfer switch - a 75-foot run. Running three additional #12 wires for the 20-amp receptacle that I put in my generator's cabinet was a simple proposition.

For your setup, my choice would running a separate 1/2" conduit between the generator and the ATS. Then, running additional wires for whatever reason would be really simple to do.
Skip Douglas
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Dormank
Looks like a new separate conduit is the way to go. I was reading somewhere that the power leads and the control system leads should be run in separate conduit and was wondering whether I should do that but then the prewired conduit for my Centurian had all the wires in a single 30 foot metal flex conduit. Is a single conduit a concern? Also for just the T1 what kind of wire and guage would you select for a 40 foot run? thanks!
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Dormank;7736 wrote:
Looks like a new separate conduit is the way to go. I was reading somewhere that the power leads and the control system leads should be run in separate conduit and was wondering whether I should do that but then the prewired conduit for my Centurian had all the wires in a single 30 foot metal flex conduit. Is a single conduit a concern? Also for just the T1 what kind of wire and guage would you select for a 40 foot run? thanks!
I ran #12 THHN wires for all of the control circuits as well as for the additional receptacle in my installation.

You might possibly run into a problem with the additional conduit that I just thought of. The flexible whip supplied by Generac is usually accepted by electrical inspectors. However, if you were to use conduit, the inspectors might insist on the separation of the generator power leads from the control circuits in two separate conduits. This would mean either tearing apart the whip or running all new wire (not the worst idea). It would be a good idea to discuss the installation with your electrician and the electrical inspector to make sure that the installation will pass the final inspection.
Skip Douglas
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ohmslaw
Dormank,
what was used to wire the original generator?
Would you be able to pull one wire through existing conduit?
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