RandySea
I have a 2012 8kw model 5837 s/n 7427274, running on propane. Aside from some odd problems I reported here that turned out to be due to loose connectors, it has been running fine. Weekly exercise mode goes in all weather, down to below 0°F. Ditto for manual monthly full test, where I cut grid power and watch the generator start up and run under a real load.

I often read the threads and comments from the experts here about other people's problems. Typical suggestions include new starters, generators, or magnetos. But is there any reason to replace or update any of these parts if the generator seems to be running well and starting reliably?

I have asked my local installer to do a tune-up and put in a new battery this spring, after snow melt. Both are probably overdue.
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78buckshot
If you have not done a recent tune up then I recommend it as long as that INCLUDES adjusting valve lash and checking gas pressures, you may run into some techs or companies that don't know how or don't include it. Parts like the starter and magneto are replaced when diagnostic shows a problem with that part, battery is considered a maintenance item and should be replaced on a 3 - 5 year cycle. Two parts that are easy to replace and prone to failure are the rubber intake manifold/snorkel that connects the air filter to the throttle body and the other is the starter contactor(solenoid). I tend to agree with your thought about "if it ain't broke don't fix it" but regular maintenance does not fall in that category.
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exrace
Being a motorcycle/car tech in my former life I was one to always troubleshoot with "divide and conquer" algorithm design paradigm to troubleshoot any electrical/mechanical issue.

Some techs are what I use to call "part swappers".
They would swap the component in question sometimes costing $$$ to the owner and then defend the choice when the swap did not fix the issue, sometimes breaking other parts along the way.
I always fear this when someone else works on my stuff or my wife's stuff.
Do they get lucky sometimes with a part swap? Yes.

Always break the issue down to the simplest component and work from there.
Loose connections can be the leading cause in a major component failure. 🙂
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78buckshot
I very much dislike the part swapper form of repair, I'm in HVAC and 90% of the trouble is electrical where you can't "see" the issue. Like you I have had my hands in mechanical/electrical stuff since I can remember, small engine, motorcycle, automotive, HVAC, electronics, etc. When you diagnose the problem correctly then the repair makes sense and should be dependable. My hobbies are geared around fixing, maintaining, restoring. My old toys include a 1955 International Harvester 300U, 1957 Chevrolet 5700 truck, 1978 Yamaha dirt bike, 1978 Chevrolet Corvette, I like the non-throw-a-way stuff, even my daily driver is a 19 year old truck.
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WadeL
exrace wrote:

Some techs are what I use to call "part swappers".


My father was a Navy radio tech in WWII.  He didn't know how radios worked, but was given a manual that showed what parts to replace until he got it working.  But... we won.
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78buckshot
My dad was also Navy WWII 1942 - 1945, USS Phoenix light cruiser, south Pacific. Luckiest ship in the navy until the British sunk it in the Falkland Island skirmish in 1981 - 1982.
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Steve H
Wow Buckshot

My sister-in-law's husband was on the Phoenix just before it was turned over to the Brits.  He said the straw bottom leaked so bad they had to run aux pumps a couple a times a day in rough seas.  I was Army so I never got wet in deep water.  We just had Monsoons.  

Re:  Parts swapping, I agree.  But unfortunately I have not solved my starting problem in 3 years now.  There was a thread going that was very close to my problem, but I lost it.  Have swapped all I'm going to swap until someone comes closer with more sensible thoughts.  It's like the reserve in the regulator is depleted.  I'm digressing
 
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W. Isaac Burkwalt UnionSchnauzerLocal1
I picked up a customer who has a 8KW that was made in the 90's. It has a vertical shaft driving a belt to a vertical shaft alternator. It has like 20 bolts holding the lid on. Sits real low to the ground. A major pain to work on. The company who serviced it wanted to install a new one. It is pretty small for the load connected to it. I told the customer that some of the parts are hard to find but with only 300 hours on it if he was happy with the unit I would be happy to serve it. 
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78buckshot
Yah, your right those are a pain to work on.
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