Zeek
My 2004 Guardian 12kw automatic standby generator (Model 4456-2) has run and operated wonderfully since I installed it back in 2014. 2 weeks ago the power went out and came back on 3 or 4 times during a major windstorm at nite. The generator started and stopped as needed with the exception of the last time. The generator was running but it was not powering the house. I shut the generator off and shut off the 50amp breaker on the generator and the breaker that supplies power to the load center with the ATS (Model OE7969) I could smell smoke and the side of the metal enclosure for the was warm to the touch. The images show what I found when I opened the load center cover.

I have done some research and understand a brownout condition can cause the coils to burn up and that there are a couple of different things to do to stop the brownout condition from burning them up. There is a brownout kit #6424 and Ziller also carries a Voltage Monitor (Brown-out Protection) [url]https://www.zillerelectric.com/products/voltage-monitor#[/url] The description states "protects against brown-out conditions that in older Generac products can cause the transfer switch to burn the utility coil from bad ('brown') power from the utility" I am guess my model would be considered and older model. Is one of the kits better than the other? Is one easier than the other to install?

I have purchased a new Generac Transfer switch Part No. OL2910 which is the updated model from the original part #OC2237. I have not installed it as yet.
One thing I find strange is that the pictures other people have posted of burnt coils is that only one of the coils appears to have burnt. Looks like both of mine burnt. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
Zeek

Quote
Peddler
This was caused by low voltage from the generator maybe 40-90 volts which was not enough to pull the switch over to emergency. The upper coil (utility) was damaged by the heat from the lower coil (emergency or generator). You can replace just the switch mechanism which may be cheaper but the complete switch will save you from having to make new wires. You need to check the AC output from the generator or this will happen again my guess would be a failed voltage regulator producing enough voltage to trick the board to thinking it was making power but not enough to pull the switch over.
Quote
78buckshot
It's hard to tell Peddler. Looks like the utility coil may have burned a little also from the looks of the relay and control cable above it. Doesn't matter now, replace the complete mechanism and add a ICM 492 single phase monitor. I set them up so the geny will respond at about 204VAC on the low end and on the high end at about 250VAC. One of the benefits of the ICM unit is that it shows a digital readout of the line voltage and you set it up based on what it is reading. With most of the other monitors you have to guess at the line voltage setting.
Quote
grsthegreat
78buckshot. Where do you install the icm492 in the unit.
Quote
Zeek
This weekend I will have to check the output of the generator. I have a couple of questions, would a wiring diagram come with the ICM 492? Would this also protect from brown out conditions on the utility side? Thank you.
Quote
78buckshot
As an authorized Generac dealer/installer/service partner we used the original Generac brownout kit and for the last three years have included it as part of each install. When the manufacturer changed the design from 5 pots to 3 pots we started having trouble with getting an accurate set-up on them. Since we are an HVACR company we have had many years of experience with voltage monitors - some single phase and lots of 3 phase. The ICM brand is a common name in the HVAC industry. The 492 is very flexible with a wide range, so now when we go back to a genny with no brownout protection we use it. The only downside is it has a little larger footprint than the Generac kit. Very easy to wire and includes detailed set-up and wiring instructions. Zeek, the monitor is wired to protect against utility low and high voltage, I have thought of using a second one to act as an overvoltage protection relay on the generator side but have not done that to date. grsthegreat, the monitor is wired in the transfer switch and wired into N1 and N2 to read utility.
Quote
grsthegreat
78 thank you. i did a bit of research and i like what i see. i think ill order one up to give it a try. ive installed the generac branded one, but i really like the digital display this one has.
Quote
78buckshot
The nice thing about the digital readout is we're not guessing what the monitor is seeing. I have found that they read a little lower than all of my Fluke meters but it really does not matter. I observe the readout for a little while to get an idea of the high and low peaks, I then set it for a rough average and adjust percentages for over and under voltage based on what it is seeing.
Quote
Zeek
This past weekend I was able to successfully remove and reinstall the new ATS in it's enclosure. Everything tested out great and all is up and running again. Now I am looking to install the ICM492 to protect against brown-outs on the utility side. Can someone that knows how, show me how this ICM492 wires in to the wiring schematic I have enclosed please?
Thanks in advance.
Zeek
Quote
GMc
Zeek,

The attached drawing is one way of installing.

Note: The darker line (original N1A wire) is disconnected/removed and the lighter lines are the new wires connecting your brownout protection device.
Quote
GMc
Zeek,

Take a look at the attached drawing and see if this makes sense. Please Note: The darker line (original N1A wire) is disconnected/removed and the lighter lines are the new wires connecting your brownout protection device.

I take no responsibility for any drawing mistakes or miss wiring.
Quote
JayH
GMc;n59966 wrote:
Zeek,

Take a look at the attached drawing and see if this makes sense. Please Note: The darker line (original N1A wire) is disconnected/removed and the lighter lines are the new wires connecting your brownout protection device.

I take no responsibility for any drawing mistakes or miss wiring.



Don't you also need to connect N1AA to ~L1 on the brownout module? Jumper NO to ~L1 Module needs to see the normal voltage.

I'd also place the module downstream of both fuses. Interrupt N1 between the cold side of the fuse and the terminal strip instead of the unfused N1A wire from the switch assembly.
Quote
GMc
Yep, that's what the jumper does, connects N1AA to L1
Quote