czarcasm
I have been dealing with a very frustrating Generac install. We bought our home about 2 years ago and the previous family left a Generac 11kw outside the home. ATS was in place but has never worked correctly. We had an electrician come out to re-do the connections and make sure everything is OK. With that behind us, we had the ATS setup to perform the auto switching. Generator was receiving power from the utility for both the startup sensing and to charge the battery - all seemed perfectly fine. Fast forward about a week and one morning I heard the generator kick on - let it run about a half hour or so and decided to check the panel on the generator to see what it thought had happened. Generator indicated loss of power detected, however, utility service was still 100% ON. Went to the ATS and discovered that the transfer mechanism had switched to the upward position and 2 of the fuses had been blown - N1 and T1. Checked for any and all crossed wires - nothing. Decided to set the pieces back to auto and then I'd just replace the fuses. Well, I had the generator breaker set to off, moved the level for the transfer mechanism manually to the auto position (down) and then turned power back on via the main breaker on the ATS and I witnessed a brief short across the E1 / E2 terminals and then the transfer mechanism slammed back into the upward position. I am at a loss at this point of why this would be happening.

Things that I have noticed... when the breaker at the generator is in the on position and I run continuity across the E1/E2/comm/ground wires they all come back as connected. When I switch this breaker on the generator to off - they are all individual as I would expect - no continuity. This could be normal, not sure as I don't know how the generator deals with these feeds.

T1 and N1 have continuity coming from the ATS. This doesn't make sense to me either.

Anyway, I'd love to hear someone's thoughts on this and what you believe it may be. Please ask any questions you have and i'll try and answer. I'm really out of options right now. Attaching picture of fuses and of E1/E2 terminal locations.
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Peddler
You need to get a wider angle shot of the transfer switch so we can see what has been done. The normal position is with the transfer switch up, the Utility connections are at the top and the load are at the bottom. The generator connections are on the upper level of the lower switch.
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nrp3
What happened to cause both n1 and t1 fuses to blow, I can't say. The reason you have continuity between N1 and T1 is when in utility, they are connected. When on the generator, E1 and T1 would have continuity.
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MacL
It sounds like everything is mostly fine. Sounds like you blew some fuses, and that your generator breaker was set to "off" at the time the fuses blew.

Is it possible there is water inside the conduit between the generator and transfer switch? Sometimes wire insulation gets chafed when it is pulled through the conduit, and then, if the conduit fills with water, a short occurs.
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czarcasm
Pardon the clutter in the picture. This was done before I moved in. The larger cables that are positioned in the lower connection are feeding the main panel. The cables that are put on the upper connections are the feed coming from the generator.
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Peddler
Sorry to be picky but that is some slopey wiring which makes things hard to see. The switch as pictured is in the utility position which has the yellow plastic arm, where you would insert the emergency shift tool, in the up position. You need to ohm out the control wires to make sure there are no shorts between them or to ground. If you are unsure of your abilities you should get a qualified technician to do this for you as there are obviously both low and high voltage issues at play here.
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MacL
Yes that is some really sloppy work. Those heavy T1 and T2 cables could be interfering with or damaging the mechanism.
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Goofy4TheWorld
When I first saw the picture I wondered to myself if that conductor that appears to possibly be resting against the fuse clips right where the SER cable's sheathing ends had shorted against the fuse holder pins. That's a really crappy spot for that bulky cable to be, and as previously posted looking at the wire job is a pretty good indicator that the quality of this installation is suspect.

Also, is that fuse powder in the bottom of the transfer switch???

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GMc
Goofy4TheWorld;n59135 wrote:


Also, is that fuse powder in the bottom of the transfer switch???



Looks like concrete dust from drilling for tap-cons
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Ron Goldstein Rongold
I think you have the model number of your transfer switch wrong. The RXSW200A3 just came out this year. The SACM in it is different than yours. The 3 fuses sit vertically in the bottom of the SACM on the RXSW200A3. Your 3 fuses are above your SACM in a separate holder. I think yours is the predecessor of the RXSW200A3 which I think was the RTSW200A3. I'm surprised some of the more experienced guys didn't notice this.

RON
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Ron Goldstein Rongold
Here's what the inside of an RXSW200A3 transfer switch looks like. The SACM is totally different than what yours looks like. This is a brand new installation. The switch was manufactured in April 2018.
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Peddler
It doesn't matter which switch it is the issues would be the same as far as the complaint. To the original post. T-1 and N-1 would have continuity if the switch is in the normal or utility position. The reason the switch slammed up is that the up position is the normal position. When utility power is restored and the transfer relay shifts to normal the upper coil is energized by the utility power to bring the switch to the utility position.
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JayH
czarcasm;n58956 wrote:
Decided to set the pieces back to auto and then I'd just replace the fuses. Well, I had the generator breaker set to off, moved the level for the transfer mechanism manually to the auto position (down) and then turned power back on via the main breaker on the ATS and I witnessed a brief short across the E1 / E2 terminals and then the transfer mechanism slammed back into the upward position. I am at a loss at this point of why this would be happening.


Was the generator running and supplying the load? This would explain the "brief short across E1/E2". If not, there should be no voltage across E1 and E2, hence no spark. The switch slamming up is normal. When you re-applied utility power the transfer switch transferred the load to utility. Safety warning: Put the fiberglass cover lying in the bottom of the switch cabinet back over the contact area of the switch. It protects against arcing. Also don't ever manually operate the switch with power applied, either generator or utility, especially with that cover missing!


czarcasm;n58956 wrote:

Things that I have noticed... when the breaker at the generator is in the on position and I run continuity across the E1/E2/comm/ground wires they all come back as connected. When I switch this breaker on the generator to off - they are all individual as I would expect - no continuity. This could be normal, not sure as I don't know how the generator deals with these feeds.


This is normal. You're measuring the stator coil of the generator through the breaker.

czarcasm;n58956 wrote:

T1 and N1 have continuity coming from the ATS. This doesn't make sense to me either.


This might help:

N1 and N2 = Normal 1 and 2, hot phases coming from utility.
T1 and T2 = Transfer 1 and Transfer 2, Power feeding the load, normally tied to N1 and N2 unless power fails, then from E1 and E2.
E1 and E2 = Emergency 1 and Emergency 2, hot phases from generator.

Three of these are extended from the switch from the generator, fused at 5A each: N1 and N2 are used by the controller to monitor utility voltage. If this goes away, the controller will start the generator and then ground wire 23 to start the transfer. This pulls in the relay in the ATS and activates the lower transfer solenoid supplied by E1 and E2.

The fused T1 wire is used to power the controller and battery charger. T1 is used instead of N1 so that the battery charger and controller stay powered from the generator during an outage. If utility power is available T1 and N1 will be connected. If the generator is running and powering the load, T1 and E1 will be connected. Check to make sure someone didn't jumper T1 and N1 inside the generator in an attempt to power the battery charger from N1.


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