VNV1967
I'm in New Jersey and My Generator has been running about 5 hours (10KW) Installed about 2011 Model (005871-0 and is still running due to this small hurricane . A while back I posted about a slight Flicker in my lighting both L.E.D. (which I know are more sensitive to flickering) and my regular incandescent bulbs.  

It seemed to before work its way out after running the Jenny under load. That was a while back. To day when the power shut off the Jenny came on with slight flickering. I measured the voltage and it's moving about 1.5 volts +and - around 119 Volts AC.

Also I have a Fluke 8060A True RMS Meter.The Feq was about 60.56 HZ or around their slightly changing. 

Right now the Flickering has stopped  but comes back slightly every now and then. The voltage now is about 119.00 to 119 .37 Freq about 60.00 to 60 .04. sometimes dropping to 59.97.

Here's my main question other the the flickering..
I'm here in my office. I have a GFI in the bathroom which feeds this office and the bathroom lights as well as the bedroom. Their is one 20 amp breaker that feeds this GFI which then splits to the other 2 rooms as described.  The bed room has two 70 watt bulbs and a TV and a clock ETC. 

Not much draw their. The Bathroom has 6 100 Watt bulbs. The office has 4 fluorescent  18 watt tubes over my desk unit. Plus alll my computer stuff Router Monitor Etc. 

About an hour ago the Genny was hitting spikes between 119 and 125 Volts AC.. I heard a Click and all was dark. The GFI in the bathroom had tripped I reset it and 2 min latter it tripped again. 

The Jenny has seemed to calm down and is running around 119 Volts AC. The GFI has not tripped.

My question is ....COULD AND OVER VOLTAGE SPIKE CAUSE THE GFI TO TRIP ?? 

AND WTF IS CAUSING THIS FLICKERING?

All answers greatly appreciated.

Thanks: Mark




                           
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murphy
A GFCI compares the current in the hot wire with the current in the neutral wire.  If they are not the same it will trip.  I suspect the ballast in your fluorescent lights caused the trip.  When the voltage changes the magnetic field in the ballast gets larger or smaller.  That can cause the currents to be unbalanced which will trip the GFCI.  I have a fluorescent light in my kitchen that used to be on a GFCI.  Every time I turned the light off the GFCI would trip.  The light is no longer on a  GFCI.
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grsthegreat
Agree with murphy. Also, an old weak gfci can be at fault. None of my gfcis trip under generator use
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Cobranut

Slight flickering, and voltage changes of just a few volts are unavoidable, especially with a small generator.
110 to 130 or so volts won't hurt appliances or electronics, but it will show up as flicker in your lights.

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78buckshot
It would also be interesting to see the current load on the generator with the voltage and freq. readings. LED's, CFL's, regular fluorescent, normal to see them flicker. As the load changes with automatic appliances such as frig, freezer, well, sump, etc. you are going to see the voltage and freq. change. I believe the unit is running correctly with a moderate load given the readings.
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Geoff Z
Why are all those items connected to the gfci receptacle when not required by code? The only thing required to be gfci protected is the receptacle itself. Unless there is some change in the NEC I'm not aware of. Somebody will correct me if I'm wrong. All those loads create a much more realistic chance to see an imbalance between hot and neutral. An imbalance as small as 6mA will trip the gfci. It is simply doing it's job. It is fine that all those items including the gfci receptacle be connected to the same branch circuit breaker. However all those other items mentioned should not be fed on the load side of a gfci receptacle. You might  be able to have an electrician rewire in the receptacle opening to change that. 
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grsthegreat
no change to code. only the outlet needs to be GFCI protected. under current codes the rest of a bedroom needs arcfault protection only.older houses dont even need that arc fault junk.
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Geoff Z
Yes that makes sense. Also the arc fault breaker would not be as sensitive as the gfci. Add the arc fault breaker and rewire the rest of the circuit on the line side of the gfci. Would be a more nuisance free installation. That won't address the flickering but will avoid being in the dark.
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78buckshot
Can I get one of you guys to add some GFCI and arc fault to the knob and tube circuits in the house I grew up in?
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grsthegreat
no habla inglés
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BillM
I am 90% LED lighting and all kinds of products.  I have Philips HUE, Philips WiZ, Sylvania, CREE and Home Depot branded ..... I have no flickering and I'm kind of worried that I should have flickering.  
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grsthegreat
Partially unscrew some. Youll get flickering. I dont have any flickering on mine either. But mine provides 22kw....
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Geoff Z
78buckshot wrote:
Can I get one of you guys to add some GFCI and arc fault to the knob and tube circuits in the house I grew up in?


Giving away your age are ya old timer!?
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BillM
grsthegreat wrote:
Partially unscrew some. Youll get flickering. I dont have any flickering on mine either. But mine provides 22kw....

Me too, 22kW and one of the fancy one's with the side outlet.  But I can cripple it like a Marine saying 'watch this' as he walks a mine field and I still don't have any flickering.  I can momentarily dim the incandescent lights of course .... still no flickering.  It would be a great indicator that I'm on gen power since I put mine far enough away I can't hear it while in the house.
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78buckshot
I'm real young, the house was real old!
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