Birken Vogt
If a timing belt breaks on a 1.5 L Mitsubishi or a 1.6 Fiat does it grenade the engine?
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BrentB
Did a 1.6 cherry awhile back. Bent all the valves. Pulled the head and brought it to the local head and block shop. Rebuilt for $ 275.00!
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78buckshot
I don't know the specs on these engines but I would bet that most modern engines are "interference" engines, meaning the valve heads and pistons will clash if it is out of time.
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Birken Vogt
I am more interested in knowing if the older 1990s Mitsubishi and/or Fiat engines were interference if anybody has had a timing belt break on one and can report what happened.
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worahm
When rubber timing belts were first introduced, the manufactures recommended replacing the belt at 60k miles. Later, they recommended replacing the belts at 90k to 100k miles.

Toyota and Ford have moved to non-interference engines several years ago.

If the maintenance schedule calls for changing the rubber belt at less then 100k miles, I suggest it is probably an interference engine.

IMHO, your problem boils down to converting miles to hours.

Bill
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worahm
Based on the information found on this web site, your 1990's Mitsubishi engine is likely an interference engine. Be prepared to replace a lot of other items when you replace the belt.
[url]http://www.denlorstools.com/autoblog/2009/09/mitsubishi-2-5-3-0-3-5-3-8-water-pump-or-timing-belt-replacement/[/url]
Bill
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MacL
worahm;36833 wrote:
When rubber timing belts were first introduced, the manufactures recommended replacing the belt at 60k miles. Later, they recommended replacing the belts at 90k to 100k miles.

Toyota and Ford have moved to non-interference engines several years ago.

If the maintenance schedule calls for changing the rubber belt at less then 100k miles, I suggest it is probably an interference engine.

IMHO, your problem boils down to converting miles to hours.

Bill


Let's see you drive a mile typically at 45 mph, so it takes 1/45th of an hour which is 1.333 minutes, done at 2000 rpms, thus 1 mile = 2,666 revolutions per mile.

times 100k miles, 266,600,000....revolutions of belt life

divided 1800 rpm, 148,111 minutes, or 2,468 hours or 1,234 hours at 3600 rpm.

Thus, the generator will rust out, or you will move before the belt needs changing.


But we have to factor in dry rotting, so I'd not do it any sooner than 10 years. Maybe 10 or 12. Or inspect it every 5 years.
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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worahm
MacL;36906 wrote:
Let's see you drive a mile typically at 45 mph, so it takes 1/45th of an hour which is 1.333 minutes, done at 2000 rpms, thus 1 mile = 2,666 revolutions per mile.

times 100k miles, 266,600,000....revolutions of belt life

divided 1800 rpm, 148,111 minutes, or 2,468 hours or 1,234 hours at 3600 rpm.

Thus, the generator will rust out, or you will move before the belt needs changing.


But we have to factor in dry rotting, so I'd not do it any sooner than 10 years. Maybe 10 or 12. Or inspect it every 5 years.

I like your arithmetic

Keep an eye out for an oil leak near the front of the engine. Oil can drastically reduce the life expectancy of the timing belt. Bil
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douglas123
if the 1.5 mitz jumps time you might as well scrap the engine Didn't sound real good according to the customer who was running it on propane heavily loaded when it let loose I still have what's left of the engine at the house.. never did like the 1.6 fiat engine pos in my book wears out at 1,200 hours
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