Gentleman
Generac 05243 16Kw unit, while running last evening, we had a voltage surge and then a large dip which resulted in all the GFCI outlets on circuits with standby power tripping. I also lost an ISOBAR surge protector protecting our home network and a couple of circuit breakers in the transfer panel tripped.

This generator has the original voltage regulator. Would these symptoms be indicative of a failing voltage regulator? I did install the updated circuit board to resolve the voltage frequency issue quite some time ago and the generator has been trouble free since. But now, I'm wondering if I've got a failing voltage regulator.

Thoughts?
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Peddler
So all these surges and dips happened while you were on generator power?? If so I would think you may want to consider a voltage regulator but if voltage returned to a normal level after the event then I would be inclined to think that voltage may have gotten on the neutral from some outside source. I would try the unit putting various loads on it to try to replicate what you had seen during the outage. A mystery but in storms you can see all kinds of things.
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Gentleman
Thanks Peddler. I'll do a load test in the coming days. This unit has about 75 hours on it and has performed well. I read somewhere in the past that the VR was prone to failure and when it does, full voltage appears at the transfer panel. Aside from the lost ISOBAR, all electronics in the house are okay today after the storm last night.
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MacL
Line to line output voltage of that unit should be about 247-250 Volts AC, and it should be steady. I'd examine the voltage output with a meter looking at the faster analog graph along the bottom, you should not see any spikes or dips in the graph line. Even though the voltage will be constantly fluctuating by a volt or so, it should not be noticeable on the graph.

Then I would set the meter to MAX/MIN and leave connected to E1 & E2 for about 10 minutes with and without load (running in manual vs transferred), and capture the highest and lowest spikes.

You could do this from a receptacle, just be looking for 123-125 volts instead. If the nominal 248 ever went to over 256 (128) or below 235 (117), (not counting picking up or dropping load), I'd replace the AVR.
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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