Sherwooddavid Show full post »
Sherwooddavid
Mine is a brand new unit and wasn’t running until today so the snow must have just blown through the louvres because of the gusty wind on the weekend. 
Quote
UPS
Wireform wrote:
You're not alone, many here have had  similar including myself. On the intake side of the generator I have a lucite 30" x 30" on an angle from just under the hatch angled away about 6" to the ground with a cinder block at its base to hold it in place. When the gen runs during a snow event it'll keep the snow from being ingested. But as an aside, always to clear away during a snow event several times so there's good clearance all around. Someone here on the forum years back rigged up a nice box structure for this very issue. .


Skip Douglas, an admin on this site, posted a picture a few years back of a lucite baffle he had built and attached.
Second post down here:
https://www.zillerstore.com/post/snow-on-the-air-filter-9946103
Quote
Sherwooddavid
The plexiglass baffle looks great. I might have to make one up.
My main concern is with all the talk about the battery heating pads shorting out mine may be laying in a half inch of snow or water if we have a snow or rain storm.  If that much snow got in when it wasn’t even running what’s going to happen during a snow storm when we have a power outage and air is being sucked in ?
Quote
78buckshot
Skip did a great job both for this forum and on his own machine, however I caution you to avoid restricting the air flow through the unit. A roof or some side baffles would be ok as long as the exhaust and heat from the left end of the machine can FREELY escape and not recirculate back to the intake, intake on the rear and on the right end. Don't worry about the left end building up too much snow, it will melt within minutes of the machine starting.
Quote
Wireform
I never worry about the exhaust ends as they melt the snow away shortly after the thing starts up. It's the intake side that needs the attention.  My way around it as I mentioned earlier is similar to a lean to on an angle with full air access extended wider then the depth of the unit giving it more protection. I keep it ther only for winter and store it the rest of the year. Still cleanup is a must in a good snow dump but just gives you more time to get at it.
Quote
Sherwooddavid
I took the front and side covers off today to have a look for moisture in the cabinet and seen no sign so that's good news.
I'll just have to go out and check it during and after every snowfall and make sure the snow is not clogging the intake louvers on the input side and back of the unit.
Thanks everyone for your advise and sharing your expertise, I really appreciate it ! Thank You
Quote
Sherwooddavid

The new generator started up today on its first 5 minute biweekly exercise and everything seems to be working as expected. I’m wondering how often I should trip the service breaker and start an actual load transfer ? Thinking maybe twice a year would be good to make sure everything is working properly ?? 

Quote
78buckshot
In your climate as in ours you will find that the oil will collect quite a bit of condensation from short run time and the engine not reaching a high enough temperature to vaporize the water and re-burn it. I would experiment with loaded runs to keep the condensation to a minimum. Just did a PM on one today that only ran 5 hours in the last year due to no outages - oil looks like coffee with lots of cream.
Quote
ohmslaw

Worked on a new Briggs today. Controller has a 45 min burn off cycle. Yearly it starts and runs to get the moisture out. 

I think that is a good idea. Programmable time number cycles would be better. They switched to programmable exercise duration  also. 
Tim 

Quote
78buckshot
I think the short run times are more harmful than good as far as the engine is concerned.
Quote
Peddler
I think you will find the EPA is driving those issues with emissions regulation.  Emergency equipment has some exemptions but total annual run times are a factor to keep the exemptions. 
Quote
Cobranut
78buckshot wrote:
I think the short run times are more harmful than good as far as the engine is concerned.


I agree.  I try to never start an engine unless I'm going to run it long enough under load to get the oil fully warmed up.
Quote
Sherwooddavid

We’re having a freezing rain storm and 60mph winds today up here in Nova Scotia and my power just went out for the first time since I completed the installation of my 20kw unit.
Everything worked fine and I was the only one on the street with power.
I have to admit I wondered if it was the right thing to do spending a pile of money on a standby generator,but when the power went out I was thinking it was well worth the investment. Thanks for all the advice guys much appreciated !

Quote
JayH

The new generator started up today on its first 5 minute biweekly exercise and everything seems to be working as expected. I’m wondering how often I should trip the service breaker and start an actual load transfer ? Thinking maybe twice a year would be good to make sure everything is working properly ?? 



My electric utility randomly tests that feature multiple times per year. There's no extra charge for this service.
Quote