Lakee911
What does anyone think about the CHTCE model ZPV36-T as an under voltage relay?

Can anyone recommend proper settings?

I have a model 0050360 ATS. Where do I want to wire it in?

Thanks
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Lakee911
Here's info on the under-voltage/over-voltage relay: [url]https://www.ebay.com/itm/Household-Self-resetting-Over-And-Under-Voltage-Protection-Relay-ZPV36-T-/121869401433[/url] Scroll down through the listing and you'll see specs, function diagram, and wiring diagram.

Here's the manual for my transfer switch: [url]http://soa.generac.com/manuals/4170099/0E9905[/url]
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Lakee911;51693 wrote:
What does anyone think about the CHTCE model ZPV36-T as an under voltage relay?

Can anyone recommend proper settings?

I have a model 0050360 ATS. Where do I want to wire it in?

Thanks
What, exactly, do you want the relay to do for you? Without knowing this, I doubt that anybody could design the interface properly.

Also, I expect that additional hardware such as a fast-acting contactor (to rapidly disconnect out-of-spec power from the home) would be needed.


In addition - I chased down some specs on the relay and found that it's designed for 220V. I doubt that's what you're using for power.
Skip Douglas
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Lakee911
SkipD;51695 wrote:
What, exactly, do you want the relay to do for you? Without knowing this, I doubt that anybody could design the interface properly.


I want to use it for brownout protection -- sorry, I thought that was clear from the subject. It would be to serve the same purpose as the kit (6424, if I recall correctly) from Generac.

I'm sure that I want it on N1 and N2, but I don't know if it's best to insert it right after the fuses or right before it goes out on the field terminals to the generator.


SkipD;51695 wrote:

Also, I expect that additional hardware such as a fast-acting contactor (to rapidly disconnect out-of-spec power from the home) would be needed.


This has it built in. It senses the voltage from its line terminals and it disconnects the load terminals when its out of spec. It has a, surprisingly, 36A rating! We don't need that rating here though.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Now I think I understand what you're wanting to do but let me ask to be sure.

I think you want the N1/N2 feed from the utility power to be opened if the voltage is below some pre-set value. Is this correct?

The cheap relay you found would probably work except for one thing. That is the "normal" voltage rating for it which is 220V. You should have something rated for about 250V so that the setpoint range would be more appropriate for our power systems.

Also - I don't know if I would want to use such a cheap device (that I wouldn't necessarily trust for long-term service) coupled with my generator.
Skip Douglas
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Lakee911
SkipD;51698 wrote:
Now I think I understand what you're wanting to do but let me ask to be sure.

I think you want the N1/N2 feed from the utility power to be opened if the voltage is below some pre-set value. Is this correct?


Yes because if the voltage is lower than a certain amount we need to open the utility sensing circuit to the generator.
SkipD;51698 wrote:

The cheap relay you found would probably work except for one thing. That is the "normal" voltage rating for it which is 220V. You should have something rated for about 250V so that the setpoint range would be more appropriate for our power systems.


This did occur to me, but I was under the impression that we need to be in the neighborhood of 190VAC to prevent burning out the transfer coil. Am I correct with that number?

SkipD;51698 wrote:

Also - I don't know if I would want to use such a cheap device (that I wouldn't necessarily trust for long-term service) coupled with my generator.


That's a valid concern, but it is a cheap generator. :D Sorry, couldn't resist! In all seriousness, I don't see a big concern. But, I may also be missing something too. If it fails closed on low voltage, I burn up the transfer coil--which I would have done anyways. If it fails open, the generator starts and I still have power (from the generator). Catastrophic failure is the biggest issue, but current will be limited to 5A by the fuses... It's a risk to be weighed.
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Ziller Tech
We set ours at 199 which is the max for the unit that we use and have never had a problem. Basically we read voltage input with N1 and N2 (after the fuses) and then break N1 through the normally open side of the relay that's internal to the unit.
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Lakee911
Chris Flagg;51700 wrote:
We set ours at 199 which is the max for the unit that we use and have never had a problem. Basically we read voltage input with N1 and N2 (after the fuses) and then break N1 through the normally open side of the relay that's internal to the unit.


Thanks, Chris.

By "break N1 through the normally open side of the relay that's internal to the unit," are you referring to the relay that's already existing in the ATS or the under-voltage relay that you're installing as part of the kit? I assume the latter, but just making sure. Also, do you break N1 right after the fuse too?

Thanks!
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Ziller Tech
I'm referring to the relay that's integral to the new part you are installing. We always do any connections after the fuses. Just protects the wiring and module should there be a problem.
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Lakee911
Chris Flagg;51702 wrote:
I'm referring to the relay that's integral to the new part you are installing.


Got it. Thanks.

Chris Flagg;51702 wrote:
We always do any connections after the fuses. Just protects the wiring and module should there be a problem.


I understand. "After the fuse" was a poor choice on my part. I meant after the fuse as in right after it as opposed to right before the field terminals that leave the panel to the generator (which is also technically after the fuse).


Thanks,
Jason
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Ziller Tech
Lakee911;51705 wrote:
Got it. Thanks.



I understand. "After the fuse" was a poor choice on my part. I meant after the fuse as in right after it as opposed to right before the field terminals that leave the panel to the generator (which is also technically after the fuse).


Thanks,
Jason


Doesn't really matter electrically. I'd do what's convenient.
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kevink1955
Item could take 50 days to ship.

A cut/paste from the E-Bay add, looks like their mission statement

In rare case, it can. of receipt. energetic and creative and wish to bring you great service and amazing experience.

I think I will stick with the ICM protector I used
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Goofy4TheWorld
kevink1955;51712 wrote:

In rare case, it can. of receipt. energetic and creative and wish to bring you great service and amazing experience.


:eek: Is it BUY IT NOW? I'm SOLD! :D
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Lakee911
kevink1955;51712 wrote:
Item could take 50 days to ship.

A cut/paste from the E-Bay add, looks like their mission statement

In rare case, it can. of receipt. energetic and creative and wish to bring you great service and amazing experience.

I think I will stick with the ICM protector I used


Goofy4TheWorld;51714 wrote:
:eek: Is it BUY IT NOW? I'm SOLD! :D


Haha. I actually have it in hand. It took 12 days to arrive. I'll try it out and report back on my "amazing experience." Not sure how I can simulate low voltage though....
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Lakee911;51715 wrote:
Haha. I actually have it in hand. It took 12 days to arrive. I'll try it out and report back on my "amazing experience." Not sure how I can simulate low voltage though....
If you had a similar unit that was ranged to 250V instead of 220V, you could tweak the low trip setpoint to make the unit switch.
Skip Douglas
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