Daveh85
I recently had a new ATS installed, the power went out today and when it came back the coil fried. Do you have any advice? Is this something once we fix that can be prevented?
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Daveh85
I should add it’s a 200 amp service rated ATS
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78buckshot
My first thought is when utility power came back it was poor/low voltage(brownout) and the coil could not shift the switch past it's center point. Now that the coil is burned and the switch is likely stuck in one position you may not be able manually test it for binding but that would be my second suspect. After you have the switch mechanism replaced you can add a Brownout Kit sold by Generac through Ziller.
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Daveh85
Thanks for the advice. Thankfully it stayed in the up position so grid power is at least restored till I get it fixed.

Here's a picture if it's of interest to anyone:  https://imgur.com/a/Wid19Gm 
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Daveh85
Correction: https://imgur.com/a/Wid19Gm
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Geoff Z
When we see a destroyed switch like that it is typically the return to utility top coil that burns in a brown out. We also find when they burn that bad it doesn't move back and forth freely to be trusted again. As 78buckshot says the coil in a brown out does not have the strength to switch past the center point. It looks to me like the bottom coil is burnt? That is controlled by the generator to pull the switch to generator position. The yellow manual handle looks burnt indicating it was in place when the fire happened? Is there a chance you left that in place with the outside cover on? The handle would have bottomed out on the back of the outer cover not allowing the limit switch to remove power from that bottom coil. That could cause it to smolder and burn.
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Geoff Z
This should be your replacement:

https://www.zillerelectric.com/products/generac-0l2911-transfer-switch-assembly-200a-2-pole-250v-replaces-0d9618
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MacL
The reason this happened is because someone left that manual operation lever in the switch and closed the cover on top of it.  See the smoke on the rubber covering, clearly indicating the stick was in the toggle at the time of transfer?  

The manual lever is for technician use only, and now you know why.  You'll likely need a new SACM module too as you probably melted some solder.  That'll be another $100.  A $600 mistake there.  And as you see, the contactor does not come with a new harness, and yours needs some fixing.

And there is still plenty left to screw up if this repair will be a DIY.  If you ground wire 194 while putting in the contactor and module, you can kill the control panel in your generator.  Before any repair is started, utility power should be off, generator should be off and its battery should be disconnected.

To prevent this in the future, store the manual lever in the bottom of the switch (or better yet, throw it away), and ....
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Geoff Z
An agreeing diagnosis from MacL who is much more technically savvy than I. Brand new Switch is $699. Along with what he explains the wiring is destroyed as well. You can put a new switch on the wall and wire it up for a little more work. Or unscrew the back board off the existing enclosure and throw the whole mess away. Take the back board out of the new switch. Even if the new back board mounting locations are slightly different with some fabrication you can make it secure in your existing enclosure. Wire it back up and done. 
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grsthegreat
Yup, I'v seen this exact picture on 2 different units this year. Both times the yellow handle was left installed and cover was closed. Personally i think those yellow handles should be thrown away. On the 2 units i repaired, the handles were left in by the installing contractor according to the home owners. Both clients told me that they had never opened the panel. Who ever installed the units is probably still installing them the same way each time. Sad. You should contact your installing contractor if they were the ones that left the handle in
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Geoff Z
A very good point. Most homeowners would not even know what that handle is for and as mentioned earlier shouldn’t be using it. 
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Cobranut
If this was the first time the system had transferred since installation, and it was installed by a contractor or dealer, then they should be liable for any repair costs.
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UPS
Looking at a 6244 owner's manual, it has instructions about how to transfer manually. There are warnings about transferring live, but there is no mention of the need to remove the handle when it is not being used.
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murphy
Common sense should tell you that if the switch was activated with that handle in there with the cover off it would be thrown across the room.  Therefore it shouldn't be left in place.
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Daveh85
I didn't realize I'd spark quite the discussion - appreciate many of the comments.

To clarify; the weather cover was not on at the time. When I came back the unit looked as it usually does, but had a nasty burnt electronics smell. It wasn't till I loosened the nut and removed the inner cover that I saw the damage inside. One of the wires, the purple one on the bottom coil, was shorting out against the coil when I first found it. Not sure if that had anything to do with it.

I'll look into the part listed above. Do you have the part # for the wiring harness also?
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Ron Goldstein Rongold
You're probably better off replacing the whole switch assembly. A whole assembly will probably be cheaper than the individual parts that you need (coils, sacm, harnesses, etc.).
That whole cabinet will probably stink forever too !!!  Replace the whole thing.
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78buckshot
I agree with some of the other members, the last person working on the switch is responsible for leaving the manual lever in the mechanism and caused the damage.
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Goofy4TheWorld
Daveh85 wrote:
To clarify; the weather cover was not on at the time. When I came back the unit looked as it usually does, but had a nasty burnt electronics smell. It wasn't till I loosened the nut and removed the inner cover that I saw the damage inside. One of the wires, the purple one on the bottom coil, was shorting out against the coil when I first found it. Not sure if that had anything to do with it


Huh?  Are you saying you had two covers??  Because all the models I have seen have only one cover??
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Peddler
The weather cover isn't the problem I think.  The inner cover that has the slot in it may have been the culprit, if the cover was put on and the yellow handle was trapped under the cover and it tried to transfer the handle prohibited it from moving down.  It only takes about 5 seconds for that coil to overheat and cook.  The only other thing that I have seen cook an emergency coil is low generator voltage 60-100 volts L-L that is not enough to pull the switch over and the coil does a somewhat slower burn.  What model generator is this being used with?
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grsthegreat
The first one i repaired required the coil assembly, the ice cube relay and the ac load shed module replaced. The wiring harness was unharmed. After buying all the parts and labor to replace, i descided on replacing entire switch guts on second unit. Way easier....possibly cheaper.
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Geoff Z


Huh?  Are you saying you had two covers??  Because all the models I have seen have only one cover??


The service entrance rated switches have 2 covers. The inner cover being considered a “dead front” cover. The reason being there is a main breaker that may need to be accessed by untrained personnel. The dead front cover protects from live exposed components while accessing the breaker. The outer cover is simply the rain tight cover. The non service entrance rated switches only have the exterior rain tight cover as there is no need for untrained personnel to ever access that switch. 
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Geoff Z
Peddler wrote:
The weather cover isn't the problem I think.  The inner cover that has the slot in it may have been the culprit, if the cover was put on and the yellow handle was trapped under the cover and it tried to transfer the handle prohibited it from moving down.  It only takes about 5 seconds for that coil to overheat and cook.  The only other thing that I have seen cook an emergency coil is low generator voltage 60-100 volts L-L that is not enough to pull the switch over and the coil does a somewhat slower burn.  What model generator is this being used with?


That makes sense as the OP stated earlier that the exterior cover was not in place during the event. I wasn’t aware the dead front cover would fit in place with the handle left in place. I would have thought the handle tip would sit too far forward? I’ll be interested to look at that the next time I have one opened up. 
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Geoff Z
grsthegreat wrote:
The first one i repaired required the coil assembly, the ice cube relay and the ac load shed module replaced. The wiring harness was unharmed. After buying all the parts and labor to replace, i descided on replacing entire switch guts on second unit. Way easier....possibly cheaper.


We have come to the same conclusion and that is what we have always done.  However the latest problem we are seeing is the way the new style load shed module snaps on to the back board. When replacing the new style guts on the back board of an older switch it takes a couple well placed holes to secure it in place. 
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