Daveh
Hi, What is a proper break in time on the generator before changing oil and or switching to synthetic?
I have a 5873 17 k;)
Thanks,
Dave
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hoghead
I had a 17 kw it didn't come with the owners manual ,But I think its 8hrs
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douglas123
According to the engine manual 0F6923, it it reccomended to change the oil after the first 8 hours of operation. It is ok to switch to synthetic after the first oil change.
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techntrek
Just to be clear, it is ok to switch to synthetic [I]at[/I] the first oil change.
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douglas123
Being the manual states after the first Oil change, I would put some more loaded run time on the unit say 20 plus hours of good running to help ensure the rings have seated good on your engine.
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genme
douglas123;9767 wrote:
Being the manual states after the first Oil change, I would put some more loaded run time on the unit say 20 plus hours of good running to help ensure the rings have seated good on your engine.
I was thinking of doing something similar with our unit - that is, running it under load for 6 to 8 hours with the factory installed oil, then replacing it with conventional oil (probably 5W-30) for another 10 hours or so, then changing to synthetic 5W-30, with filter changes at every oil change.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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techntrek
Shouldn't hurt to let it break-in for a longer period of time. However, the manual for my unit clearly states to change the oil to synthetic after doing a 4-hour break-in.

"Drain the oil and remove the oil filter. Replace the
oil filter according to Section 4.4, “Changing the
Oil Filter”. Replace the oil with synthetic oil as
recommended in Section 4.3, “Changing the
Engine Oil”
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genme
Follow the manual for time to change the break in oil. I believe our manual states 8 hours - that's why I listed 6 to 8 with my intention to change oil again shortly thereafter.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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douglas123
Just curious what owners manual the was in Could you provide the manual #. Not saying you were miquoating or something. I have run across several discrepencies and like to follow up with misprints. Several months ago started up a new liquid cooled unit new. Radiator cap was the russian flavor and broken, ordered from the new owners manual by part number and got a made in mexico radiator cap. Go figure.
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techntrek
I have a different version at home than the one I have at work, but they say the same thing. It covers 2 different model numbers, mine is the 4456-3.

Part No. 0F3982 Revision D (10/05/05)
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genme
8 hours listed. Manual 0H8358 "Owner's Manual" for "8, 10, 13, 14, 16, 17 & 20kW Air-cooled,
Automatic Standby Generators", Revision C 11/06/10, page 28.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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techntrek
I just checked the version I have at work and this is its part number:

Part No. 0E9057 Revision E (11/18/04)

Covers 3 models (the one I have at home covers the same models):

• 04389-3 – 6 kW NG, 7 kW LP, single-cylinder GH-
410 Engine
• 04456-3 – 12 kW NG, 12 kW LP, V-twin GT-990
Engine
• 04390-3 – 13 kW NG, 15 kW LP, V-twin GT-990
Engine

Two different versions of the same manual, same break-in time, 4 hours. Since yours is more generic and doesn't cover 6 and 12 kw models, I think "8 hours" is more suspect.
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genme
techntrek;9788 wrote:
Two different versions of the same manual, same break-in time, 4 hours. Since yours is more generic and doesn't cover 6 and 12 kw models, I think "8 hours" is more suspect.
Nothing suspect about it. I just looked at the paper manual that came with my generator. It agrees with 8 hours. It also lists oil change intervals (after the break-in period) as every 200 hours or 2 years, whichever occurs first.

I'm sure I will do more frequent oil changes than Generac calls for. I think we can agree that it is best to treat the manufacturers oil change interval as a maximum. :)
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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techntrek
Not suspect for your model or the OP's, yes, since your manual covers it (he said he has a 17kw model). So I agree that 8 hours is what he should go with, but not for mine.

My manual states [B]annual [/B]oil changes so it differs from yours on that point, too. Obviously your manual is not meant to cover the models that mine does.
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genme
I agree - everyone should stick to the schedule for their particular unit. Personally, I think a two year oil change interval is suspect even though the manual calls for it. :eek:
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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techntrek
Oil change - yes and no. With the extremely clean burn of LP and NG, plus the use of synthetic, and if you live in an area that has few/short outages, I think you could easily go 3-4 years. LP/NG don't produce the particulates that foul up gasoline and diesel engine oil, and sythetic is cleaner to begin with. If a genset runs 12 minutes per week that is about 10 hours per year, then add in 5-10 hours of actual service which brings you to 15-20 hours total. Your average car is driven ~400 hours per year and gets ~4 oil changes (again, with a much dirtier burn) so that makes the genset's job a cake walk. Having said that, [U]I do change mine every year [/U]- but 2 years ago I thought I had an oil filter on the shelf and didn't, and only changed the oil, and didn't loose any sleep over it. Those filters process so much less oil - and less dirty oil - compared to a car or tractor.
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techntrek
As an interesting side-note, we've had a Prius for 3 years now, and this past weekend I put synthetic in it for the first time. Just over the last 3 days driving it to work its average mpg has risen by 4 and is still rising.
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johnc
Since we're discussing oil changes, if I may add something here. A buddy of mine had a warranty call on his gen. The service tech was a retired military gentleman, whose job in the military was maintaining gens. He made the point that NG burns so very dry that it is necessary to check your oil level often, due to oil evaporation. No mention of LP. May be helpful?
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techntrek
Doing a quick search of the net, ignoring the obvious gas-industry P.R. sites, I found this mention on a site that was pushing wood burning stoves. So unlikely they benefit by saying this:

"Natural gas and propane are the cleanest burning fuels."

Looking at a natural gas P.R. site, this is what they say:

"Natural gas is the cleanest of all the fossil fuels, as evidenced in the Environmental Protection Agency’s data comparisons in the chart below [which I didn't include], which is still current as of 2010. Composed primarily of methane, the main products of the combustion of natural gas are carbon dioxide and water vapor, the same compounds we exhale when we breathe."

Looking at a propane P.R. site:

"...the level of damaging emissions following LP Gas combustion is far below that of any readily available carbon based fuel used in vehicles and engines today. Propane is clean burning and environmentally friendly. In fact, propane is listed as an approved clean fuel by U.S. Government energy policy makers and energy administrative bodies."

Too bad we can't rely on hydrogen yet, it only produces water!
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