2Wire
My question  concerns drain on the battery model 7173 EVO2.0 during outages, and when the generator is stopped. Typically do not run at night. Seems as if the battery will drain if no mains, no gen running. so how long can this condition go without issue of no start-up? Will removing the 7.5A fuse keep the battery up without a draining load?
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Cobranut

You need to have utility power to a standby genset continuously or the battery will drain in just a few days.
The charger on the air cooled units also needs to be powered by the genset when it is running., so it must come from the load side of the transfer switch.

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Birken Vogt
Many people around here got to shutting them down overnight during the long outages and did not hear of any problems.  But a couple days is accurate.  Pulling the fuse does cut power but you lose time and whatnot.
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2Wire
seems like a good idea to have a spare battery on trickle charge...
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MacL
One overnight would probably not be a problem, the battery would be all but entirely discharged (2 volts) in 6 to 7 days.  But a battery is considered 0% charged when it reaches 10.5 volts.  A fully charged battery if disconnected would probably be fine for 30 days.  I'm not sure if the 7.5 amp fuse shuts down all the power consumption or not.  It may not.

This latest model makes getting to the battery to disconnect it daily a pain too.  I'd recommend flipping that bracket under the 10mm bolt upside down and putting the bolt back in, and only putting the two screws at the top finger tight.
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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UPS
Unless the battery is a true deep cycle model, letting it frequently run very low will gradually reduce its capacity and its life expectancy.  Overnight should be OK.  A solar charger can help if the off periods are long.

2Wire wrote:
seems like a good idea to have a spare battery on trickle charge...

Having a spare is good insurance.
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2Wire
Yes, that bottom bolt at the front panel is a real PITA.
The other possibility (if the battery goes low) without removing the panel, is connecting a charged battery right at the starter solenoid... no???
Should be always battery +12 V there, (wire 13). But, of course, the starter is located in a very hard to access area.
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JayH

2Wire wrote:
seems like a good idea to have a spare battery on trickle charge...


If the generator is in a location where you can drive a vehicle up to it, a set of jumper cables will also do the trick.

A trickle-charged spare battery will degrade over time just like the one in the generator, figure three year service life to be on the safe side.

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Isslandboy
What about something like this;Image result for battery disconnect switch
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MacL
DO NOT EVER JUMP START YOUR GENERATOR WITH AN AUTOMOBILE OR JUMP PACK  UNLESS YOU WANT TO BUY A NEW CONTROLLER



The best thing for the generator and your warranty coverage is to use the product as intended and designed.  If I came out there to replace a smoked board and you told me you had "jumped it off", it would not be a warranty claim.  

No, you should not connect a charged battery to the starter solenoid.  Why would you do that when there's a nice cable you can connect the battery to already there?  I told you how to do away with the front attachment so as to only use the two screws on the top edge to hold the right side on.  You'd have cables draped across a hot engine,  it would be operating with the covers not in place which could cause overheating issues, and if the dead battery is still in there it would drain your new battery as they equalized

As designed is better for everyone.
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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2Wire
I do see your point on never connecting anything except a battery as specified by the mfg. (as I was talking about). Swapping it in would be best.  That could be a car battery too as long as polarity is correct, and it is not being charged by anything else other than the controller . Of course all this assumes someone knows what they are doing. As I said, the starter motor is harder to get to than the battery terminals. It is electrically, (wire 13) the same point in the circuit as the Hot + battery terminal. No??? Wire 13.jpg 
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MacL
This is a brand new generator isn't it?  Just recently installed and no problems?
State your problem, not your diagnosis.
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grsthegreat
i shut mine down at night if power is out and im heading off to bed. have done so for many years and never had any issues. I do have a brown out kit installed in mine...just incase... as i have had to repair a few transfer switch coils over the years.
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grsthegreat
i learned my lessons about jump starting anything electronic a few years back when i jumped started my jet ski.   $500 later i learned my lesson. i would never jump start a generator
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Geoff Z
[QUOTE username=MacL userid=6425578 postid=1310433848]DO NOT EVER JUMP START YOUR GENERATOR WITH AN AUTOMOBILE OR JUMP PACK  UNLESS YOU WANT TO BUY A NEW CONTROLLER

I have always told customers not to jump start or put a trickle charger on a battery while it is connected to the generator. It is introducing a stray voltage into the system either way. I've had customers in both scenarios and it normally doesn't end well.



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2Wire
Who is this person that is, or is suggesting,  jump starting their generator from a running car, or a jump pack?
As I said several times prior... BEST TO SWAP IT OUT. Remove the panel, remove and replace battery. Is that a JUMP???
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Birken Vogt
I jump start these things on a regular basis.  Usually with a new spare battery from the truck and cables carried over to the dead unit because the truck itself won't get close enough.

The thing that kills them is hooking them up backwards but nobody will admit to it.
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Cobranut


Birken Vogt wrote:
I jump start these things on a regular basis.  Usually with a new spare battery from the truck and cables carried over to the dead unit because the truck itself won't get close enough.

The thing that kills them is hooking them up backwards but nobody will admit to it.


Exactly. No reason a proper jump start should damage anything. 
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JayH
2Wire wrote:
Who is this person that is, or is suggesting,  jump starting their generator from a running car, or a jump pack?
As I said several times prior... BEST TO SWAP IT OUT. Remove the panel, remove and replace battery. Is that a JUMP???


This discussion started regarding the situation where a battery would be discharged by the controller during a long outage if the generator is manually switched off. In such cases you would have a battery that is not defective and in need of replacement, just discharged.

Connecting a charged battery with jumper cables assuming that you observe polarity will have the same result as swapping in a charged battery. It will allow the starter to crank and start the generator. Once the MLCB is turned on the internal charger will start bringing the generator's battery back to full charge through the T1 wire. There's no need to have the vehicle running, which I suppose one could argue theoretically might result in overvoltage or dirty power. The starter current on a generator is relatively low compared to that on a car or truck. The generator expects to see a charged 12-volt battery between wire 0 and wire 13. Providing that voltage from a vehicle's battery will not cause damage if done correctly and carefully.
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murphy
A wet cell lead acid starter battery that has been totally discharged has been permanently damaged.  Material flakes off of the plates and accumulates at the bottom of the cell.  When the pile of debris reaches the bottom of the plates it shorts out the cell which ends its life.  The battery was designed to provide a burst of high current for several seconds and then immediately be recharged.  Deep discharge batteries exist but they are not wet cell starter batteries.
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Birken Vogt
murphy wrote:
A wet cell lead acid starter battery that has been totally discharged has been permanently damaged.  Material flakes off of the plates and accumulates at the bottom of the cell.  When the pile of debris reaches the bottom of the plates it shorts out the cell which ends its life.  The battery was designed to provide a burst of high current for several seconds and then immediately be recharged.  Deep discharge batteries exist but they are not wet cell starter batteries.


In principle this is correct, but a generator battery that cranks a 2 cylinder air cooled engine but is big enough to work on a full size V8 will likely be OK if it gets run down and recharged.

I often request to the customer to swap them out if they are fully dead just for peace of mind and because it is the quickest way to get the intended result (generator running again) but often just recharging works fine.
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2Wire
...and anyway, who here is suggesting to totally discharge the battery. I did not mean to start a school on battery maintenance in a posting. Batteries seem to be quite a controversial subject.
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nfw01
Ok, don't want to wade into anything to deep here, but, I threw an Optima deep cycle get battery into my unit when first I got it ... ran fine for over 10 years ... took a tornado and lightning strikes to do in the charging circuit, and apparently that battery ... and the local essential services guy in my area to truly mess things up ... a new gel battery and a trickle charger has kept things for the past few years .... may have to buy a new ?? one of the boards, charger or controler one of these days, most likely this spring when the weather turns warmer ...  but, for now, it roars to life when needed, and self tests the rest of the time ... so ... Might I suggest you try a really good battery with a trickle charger on it? Works for me.
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Geoff Z
Yes a good quality battery and a working Generac on board charger is reliable
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