Siegfried
I noticed the paint near the battery of my 20KW Generac is starting to bubble up.  Does anyone have any suggestions for dealing with this issue, such as battery tray, battery mat, etc?
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78buckshot
I recommend keeping the battery maintained correctly, this means the proper rate of charge and don't overfill the cells. If you wash the area with baking soda/water mixture and dry it well then you could use some high zinc primer and topcoat,( POR 15 comes to mind) once the oxidation starts it's hard to arrest it. Check the battery voltage while the unit is at rest, if it is over 14.3 vdc it is probably overcharging. I don't like anything under the battery that could hold acid against the metal.
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Dick from Canada
 Some acid may have been spilled during  level checks or the battery may have been tipped for some reason. Do you smell any acid ?  If the battery top is not clean some moister may have formed as a result of condensation and worked its way to where your rust is .  Over charging will cause acid to leak,even damaging the walls of the battery . A nasty mess.  Clean your rust spot well , to bare metal, prime and paint.  As suggested  be sure to check your charging voltage .
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Siegfried
Thanks for the recommendations.
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Steve H
Typically that means the posts are leaking vapors through the post seals.  The cause of the seal breaking is over torquing the the nut and not holding the post while tightening.  The vents on the caps are made not to vent towards the posts .  You don't need to make the nuts super tight.  They only need to be snug.  You hold them to counter torque.

Remove the connector and run a thin layer of RTV around the base, sealing the case to the post.  Put some vasoline on the inside of the post and reinstall.  You want to get the posts done before the RTV cures.  Smear some vasoling on the post connectors when done.

People argue with this until they have seen it done.  I been doing this for a week and a half.  LOL
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UPS
Steve H wrote:
Typically that means the posts are leaking vapors through the post seals.  The cause of the seal breaking is over torquing the the nut and not holding the post while tightening.  The vents on the caps are made not to vent towards the posts .  You don't need to make the nuts super tight.  They only need to be snug.  You hold them to counter torque.

Remove the connector and run a thin layer of RTV around the base, sealing the case to the post.  Put some vasoline on the inside of the post and reinstall.  You want to get the posts done before the RTV cures.  Smear some vasoling on the post connectors when done.

People argue with this until they have seen it done.  I been doing this for a week and a half.  LOL


There is one issue to consider when using silicone - it is very hard to remove if required in the future.  Vaseline works.  Marine battery terminal spray, also.
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78buckshot
UPS, I think he is saying to seal the very bottom of the post to the case of the battery with silicone, then the vasoline to keep the post and clamp from oxidizing. One thing I had to teach the young install crew was to be gentle with the battery posts - no hammer needed. I like the new terminals for that reason.
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UPS
78buckshot wrote:
UPS, I think he is saying to seal the very bottom of the post to the case of the battery with silicone, then the vasoline to keep the post and clamp from oxidizing. One thing I had to teach the young install crew was to be gentle with the battery posts - no hammer needed. I like the new terminals for that reason.


That should be OK if the RTV is allowed to harden somewhat before the connector is pushed down, or if the connector has grease on it - otherwise the stuff could seal the terminal to the case and would need some serious work to get off again.  I saw that once on a 3-battery boat.
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78buckshot
I agree
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BrianMartin
78buckshot wrote:
UPS, I think he is saying to seal the very bottom of the post to the case of the battery with silicone, then the vasoline to keep the post and clamp from oxidizing. One thing I had to teach the young install crew was to be gentle with the battery posts - no hammer needed. I like the new terminals for that reason.


A hammer or pliers can be tempting... I agree the new style is a huge improvement.
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Steve H
Brian  I think you're over concerned.  I've used RTV in lots of different applications.  It's adhesive qualities are good, but shouldn't be an issue here.  Buckshot is on the same page with me.  If you want to prevent the terminal from sticking, simple vasoline the bottom of the terminal.

Some of us old timers have some pretty good solutions to save money or to get all your money out of something
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Dick from Canada
Yes some RTV works great. Clean the surface well with a clean cloth and apply a  dab and work around with you index finger . Don't play with it. I like the red RTV . Good heat and chemical resistance. Consider buying a terminal  and connector cleaner. Works great and won't break the bank.   I have tapped some wrenches for battery work to prevent shorting or grounding .  There is a lot of energy in a battery even a " dead" one . I always wear eye protection as well . Be careful and good luck .
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Cobranut
Yes some RTV works great. Clean the surface well with a clean cloth and apply a  dab and work around with you index finger . Don't play with it. I like the red RTV . Good heat and chemical resistance. Consider buying a terminal  and connector cleaner. Works great and won't break the bank.   I have tapped some wrenches for battery work to prevent shorting or grounding .  There is a lot of energy in a battery even a " dead" one . I always wear eye protection as well . Be careful and good luck .


Eye protection is a very good idea when working around batteries.  If you've ever seen what happens when they explode, you'll never forget those safety glasses again. They can save your vision. 
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Dave_eng
I removed my battery from the enclosure and put it in a marine battery box.  Cables were long enough to reach.  Never regretted it especially since my unit dated from the time when batteries were exploding from charger problems. Much easier to access front of engine when checking valve clearances.
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78buckshot
The marine box is a good idea for the 4000 series generators, too bad they won't fit in the 5000 - 6000 series.
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