David Simmons

The info plate on my 17kW generator Model: 0055040/SN#: 5100686,  lists the “AMPS 141.7170.8” is this amount of amps I have available for my whole house? Thanks In Advance, David

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murphy
17000 watts divided by 240 volts = 70.83 amps.  I have no idea what 141.7170.8 is.  It looks like a part number.  What is before the word AMPS?
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Geoff Z
You should have 70.83amps available at 240v and 141.67amps available at 120v. That is based on the fuel source being LPV. Will be slightly less for NG. Yes that is the total output available from the generator. Your total connected load should not exceed that.
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David Simmons
Thanks for the quick feed back, here's a pic link to plate on generator:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/oS1CGqaycophqFUf7
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murphy
I see the point of confusion.  The plate says     141.7    /   70.8.
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David Simmons
So does that mean i can run 110V/220V breakers not to exceed 141.67 amps?
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murphy
There is no such thing as 110 / 220.  The voltage in the USA is 120 / 240. 

You need to do a load analysis of your house to determine if the generator can support the whole house or if some loads, usually 240 volt loads need to be set up for automatic disconnection when the generator is running.  There is a defined process but I have lost my link to the process.
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David Simmons
Thank You Murphy for your reply I kinda understand what your saying
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Brian Baughman
It can be confusing, but the intent was to state in theory that the generator could produce up to 141.6 amps of power for 120V loads.  There could be up to 70.8 amps of connected 120V load on the "A" phase and up to 70.8 amps of connected load on the "B" phase.  The generator cannot handle any more than 70.8 amps on either phase, but the 2 numbers added together = 141.6.  

17000/120= 141.6 Amps
17000/240 = 70.8 Amps
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Cobranut
It can be confusing, but the intent was to state in theory that the generator could produce up to 141.6 amps of power for 120V loads.  There could be up to 70.8 amps of connected 120V load on the "A" phase and up to 70.8 amps of connected load on the "B" phase.  The generator cannot handle any more than 70.8 amps on either phase, but the 2 numbers added together = 141.6.  

17000/120= 141.6 Amps
17000/240 = 70.8 Amps


Yep, I always wondered why the manufacturers even show the amps totaled up that way, as it only leads to confusion.
The 70.8 amp rating per phase is all that matters.
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Brian Baughman
murphy wrote:
There is no such thing as 110 / 220.  The voltage in the USA is 120 / 240. 

You need to do a load analysis of your house to determine if the generator can support the whole house or if some loads, usually 240 volt loads need to be set up for automatic disconnection when the generator is running.  There is a defined process but I have lost my link to the process.


That is an incorrect statement.  There are many parts of this country where the utility single phase voltage can still be 110/220, and even some areas with 115/230.  It depends on who is your utility provider and how old is the utility transformer that is supplying power to your home.  120/240 in now the standard, but back in early 1900's there was no standard voltage but 110/220 was the common voltage with some areas having 115/230.  120/240 became the standard utility single phase voltage in the late 1960's/early 1970's.  

This is why many people that are part of the older generations still call it 110/220.
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Geoff Z
2017 NEC Article 100 Definitions. Voltage, Nominal is designated as 120/240. Informational Note No. 1: The actual voltage at which a circuit operates can vary from the nominal within a range that permits satisfactory operation of equipment. I was not aware there are still areas seeing 110/220 and 115/230.
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Geoff Z
Moved to Generac Air Cooled Generators Category
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