pwebb
Long story short. Have a 22kw mod 5638. Definate lightning strike. Less than two year old unit with 16 hours. Contacted the local service rep replaced fuses and battery, etc. $1000 later, he realized he was not certified to work on this size unit. Another "larger" service center replaced control board, gas selenoid valves, troubleshoot. Another $1,000, got the engine running again only to find out that it would only produce 43v. Service center suggestion, claim a total replacement on insurance. I down loaded similar diagnostic manuals and checked it myself. I found the exitation circuit breaker(CB2) failed open and other items not wired correctly; jumped across CB2 and unit dropped to 21v. The AVR shows red and yellow light on but green off. The jumper wire across CB2 shows 6.5amps. I think is supposed to be 3amp or less. My ohm meter is not sensiive enough below 1.0 to test stator. Also cannot find an exact diagnostic manual. All I found show the old style regulator.

Is the unit worth saving. Insurance has agreed to pay for replacement. I hate to junk a new unit. Does anyone think the rotor/ stator or the AVR is worth trying, or will I continue to chase problems like the service center. The motor runs like a champ.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
If your insurance company will pay for the replacement unit, installation costs, and the troubleshooting/repair attempts, then I would say to go for it. They probably won't want the old unit so you may have some spare partss available.
Skip Douglas
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ceb58
SkipD;8104 wrote:
If your insurance company will pay for the replacement unit, installation costs, and the troubleshooting/repair attempts, then I would say to go for it. They probably won't want the old unit so you may have some spare partss available.


Very much agree. If they are going to pay to replace it then replace it and be done with it. If you can keep the old unit for parts then that's good if not let it go. You will be getting a new unit that is under warranty. But I will say if the old unit took a hit like that I would seriously look at the grounding system.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
ceb58;8119 wrote:
.... But I will say if the old unit took a hit like that I would seriously look at the grounding system.
I'll agree with that 100%.

At our previous home, I had a 50-ft amateur radio tower that took a direct lightning hit. In addition to spewing the upper antenna all over the property, the dirt around the 8' ground rods at the base of the tower was turned into glass, very effectively insulating the ground rods. I used to be able to measure a ground conductivity until the hit. The solution was to drive a new set of ground rods in different locations.
Skip Douglas
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DanB
hopefully your insurance rates wont rocket
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ceb58
SkipD;8120 wrote:
I'll agree with that 100%.

At our previous home, I had a 50-ft amateur radio tower that took a direct lightning hit. In addition to spewing the upper antenna all over the property, the dirt around the 8' ground rods at the base of the tower was turned into glass, very effectively insulating the ground rods. I used to be able to measure a ground conductivity until the hit. The solution was to drive a new set of ground rods in different locations.


Was your grounding system for the tower tied back to your premise grounding system?
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