brentlychurch
I have a Briggs (all Generac) EXL 8000 Generator. It only has two duplex receptacles so I can only pull so many amps before tripping a breaker. With 12500 surge watts I should be able to have more sockets like some of the newer generators I've seen. I've installed 20 amp breakers due to the 15 amp breakers tripping running a 12 amp blower. What are you guys thoughts on adding some plugs to use all the juice this thing can give.
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mastr
I think the 15A breakers are there for a reason. Stop fooling around and get a proper distribution panel that you can plug into the 120/240 twistlock receptacle.
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brentlychurch
How will a distribution panel help if the twist lock plug is limited to thirty amps. That doesn't address the problem I'm having. BTW I don't fool around.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
Breaker sizing is not something one should do for simple convenience. Breaker sizing has EVERYTHING to do with the size of the wiring the breaker is protecting. You have, very possibly, created an unsafe condition by simply changing the breakers if you didn't also re-wire the generator internally.

The suggestion to use the 30-Amp 240 Volt connection and obtain a distribution panel (or, [U]if you are truly qualified[/U], make up your own with proper sized wiring and associated breakers) is a very good suggestion if you cannot get by with 15-Amp 120-Volt service. You could use all #12 (or larger) wiring and 20-Amp breakers in front of 20-Amp receptacles in your distribution panel. If you're going to use power approaching the generator's limit, it would be a very good idea to use extension cords with at least #12 (or smaller number) wiring in them as well.

By the way, you should totally ignore the "surge watts" rating of the generator and you should also realize that the 8000 Watt rating is, in itself, a bit on the generous side. You should never attach any loads to the generator that would exceed 30 Amp 120 Volt draw from [U]either side[/U] of the generator's windings. Balancing the loads (using both sides of the 240 V output) is mandatory to get the most output from the generator. It's possible that you may need to learn a bit more about household 240/120 Volt single phase wiring to understand how the generator (and transformers) deliver the power.
Skip Douglas
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mastr
Skip-I did not intend to suggest that the OP fabricate a distribution panel, such a suggestion to one who changes breakers indifferently opens up worlds of opportunity for disaster.

brentlychurch- There are many commercially available portable devices that will safely give you more receptacles. Here [url]http://www.nextag.com/portable-power-distribution-box/stores-html[/url] is a page of examples. If such a device "doesn't address the problem...", it probably can't be without repealing the laws of physics.
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Skip Douglas SkipD
mastr;9314 wrote:
Skip-I did not intend to suggest that the OP fabricate a distribution panel, such a suggestion to one who changes breakers indifferently opens up worlds of opportunity for disaster.
That is an excellent thought, and I edited my post above to reflect it.
Skip Douglas
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brentlychurch
I see what your saying about the watt rating being misleading. The surge watts did seem extreme to me.

I have other units and they out perform this one and I just wanted to see if I can get this one up to par.

The internal wire gauge of the factory panel was addressed with the new breakers. I'm not even getting close to overloading the generator. I've not changed the main 30 amp breaker.

I'll read up on "balancing the load", that's the answer I was looking for. Can you elaborate some more on that principle. Say I use a 220 Y splitter and only use one side. Is the generator still balanced if I do this? I'm leery of puling 20 Amps off of one side, Thanks
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Skip Douglas SkipD
brentlychurch;9328 wrote:
I'll read up on "balancing the load", that's the answer I was looking for. Can you elaborate some more on that principle. Say I use a 220 Y splitter and only use one side. Is the generator still balanced if I do this? I'm leery of puling 20 Amps off of one side, Thanks
In very elementary terms, household power in the USA - and your generator - is supplied as single-phase 240 VAC with a "neutral". The voltage between either side of the 240 VAC wiring and the neutral is 120 VAC. Click on [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Split_phase][U][COLOR=Blue]this link to Wikipedia[/COLOR][/U][/url] for a page that has a drawing of a typical transformer that powers a home. Your generator is essentially identically wired.

What you want to do for efficiency (and the lowest billing) is to put the same load on either side of the transformer feeding your home or on your generator. That is one reason why my heavy loads (my air conditioner, welder, table saw, etc.) are wired for 240 V operation. My two 120 V sump pumps are each wired to the opposite side of the power feed so that if both turn on, the load is balanced.
Skip Douglas
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mastr
brentlychurch;9328 wrote:
...Say I use a 220 Y splitter and only use one side. Is the generator still balanced if I do this? I'm leery of puling 20 Amps off of one side, Thanks


A splitter will not balance a single 120V load across your sets windings. Let's say you have a 20A 120V heater- whether or not you use a splitter, you will be drawing 20A from one "side" of the set's windings and zero from the other.

The only way to balance a single 120V load on your set is a 240-120V transformer. (Unfortunately, a 7.5Kva dry tranformer weighs about 100lbs, and may cost as much as the generator) Then you would use your 240v outlet to feed the transformer, and run 120V loads from the tranformer secondary. Using the above example heater, you would draw 10A from each "side" of the generator winding (plus some small amount for transformer loss).
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