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ceb58
mastr;9597 wrote:
Aluminum is for soda cans and car wheels. Tighten a breaker lug down on aluminum wire and come back in 24 hours. It will likely be loose; tighten it some more, then check a week later. You will quickly see why I don't like aluminum wire.


What he said. Plus the gen. breaker will be located where there is moisture in the air. If you don't pile on the antioxidant the alum will oxidize quickly and make for a bad connection.
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genme
Thanks guys. I'll see if I can swing the copper.

Per our manual:
"11. Connect the control wires to the correct terminals. The terminals are clearly marked N1, N2, 23, 194 and T1. If connecting a pre-wired switch a 0 (zero) wire will also be required."

What purpose does the zero wire serve? Do we need to connect it? Our service rated transfer switch came with the generator in the 5875 package, but it is not pre-wired.

I also see torque values for tightening the lugs. Do electricians actually use torque wrenches to do this? I know many car mechanics don't use torque wrenches even though torque values exist for lug nuts, various drain plugs, etc.

Thanks everyone for your help.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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Skip Douglas SkipD
I would recommend that you run some extra wires, just in case you want to put a receptacle in your generator that's powered by both utility and generator power. I ran a set of three #12 THHN wires - red, white, and green - along with all the control wires so that I could fully wire up the receptacle.

Now that I have the receptacle in my generator housing, I use it for a battery maintainer (replacing the original Generac charger) and a battery warming blanket for the cold winters here.
Skip Douglas
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genme
Thanks Skip. Would you suggest a 15 amp or 20 amp outlet (assuming an aftermarket battery, crankcase warmer, and battery charger as a worst case scenario)?

I found a more recent manual that explains that the zero wire is required for battery charging (if I read it correctly.)

Do electricians typically use a torque wrench for tightening lugs? Feel free to PM me to give a confidential opinion. I just don't want an electrician looking at me like I'm crazy for asking about it.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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ceb58
genme;9615 wrote:


Do electricians typically use a torque wrench for tightening lugs? Feel free to PM me to give a confidential opinion. I just don't want an electrician looking at me like I'm crazy for asking about it.


On small jobs like yours..... no . On larger switch gear and MDP....... yes most of the time it is required to provide a torque sheet after the install.
You are the customer, you have the right to ask for and demand that all connections are torqued to the mfg's specks because it is a code requirement.
Now if I were your elect. I would gladly get out the torque wrench and screwdriver and torque to the specks as long as you are paying the bill. Just don't come up at the end of the job wanting it done let it be known from the start.
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genme
Thanks ceb. Are you saying that torquing to spec takes more time to do? I know nothing about torquing electrical connections, but I have torque wrenches that I use on my car.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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mastr
In 35 years, I have never seen a torque wrench used in residential or light commercial work. If you want your work done with a torque wrench or torque limiting screwdriver, say so beforehand, not after the work is done or nearly so. No one likes to go back and "re do" finished work; it is even more irritating when said work seems (to them) perfectly acceptable as it is.
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ceb58
genme;9617 wrote:
Thanks ceb. Are you saying that torquing to spec takes more time to do? I know nothing about torquing electrical connections, but I have torque wrenches that I use on my car.


Yes, it takes longer on a situation like yours. Torquing screws with a torque screwdriver is a PITA.

Unless it is written into the specks on commercial jobs it is almost unheard of to torque every thing on such a small job. You will be the customer the electrician laughs about while he is cashing the larger than should have been check.
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genme
Thanks. That's why I asked. :-)
Torque wrenches are very easy to use. Shame the torque screwdrivers aren't.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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genme
Should the 6 control wires also be derated for the attic temperature? What gauge would you suggest?

Thank you for your continued assistance!
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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Skip Douglas SkipD
I suggest that you run all THHN wire. As to the size, #14 is fine for everything except the receptacle if you want it to be a 20-amp receptacle. If a 15-amp receptacle is enough for you, then #14 is fine for that too.

I ran #12 wiring for my in-generator receptacle (all three wires) and used a 20-amp receptacle to boot. That way I can use any 120 VAC tool that I might come up with out near the generator.
Skip Douglas
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genme
Thanks Skip!

Is it ok to connect the THHN stranded directly to an outlet? I'm used to seeing solid house wire connected to an outlet. How do you prepare the strands?

We're under NEC 2008. No other local codes.
Model 5875, Nexus controller, 999cc Engine, 20kW LP, 2011
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Skip Douglas SkipD
genme;9631 wrote:
Thanks Skip!

Is it ok to connect the THHN stranded directly to an outlet? I'm used to seeing solid house wire connected to an outlet. How do you prepare the strands?

We're under NEC 2008. No other local codes.
If I have to put the stranded wire around a screw, I spin the entire stranded set tightly with a pliers to make what acts almost like a solid wire.

Normally, I use receptacles that have the back feed with clamps (NOT the back feed with spring clips - those are horrible) and merely insert the wire and tighten the clamp screw.
Skip Douglas
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