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  • Transfer Sw install

    The new Genset is in and now waiting for the Co. to install the new Tx Sw They are claiming the County says the sw needs to be outside. The old sw is inside and was passed when installed in 2005. Does anyone know if the NEC was changed as far as working/access clearances since that time?(2005).
    Current code says 36" in front of the panel and a min of 30" wide, 6 feet high---of course that is only if the eq is "likely" to be serviced while energized.

  • #2
    Some utilities require that the service disconnect be installed outdoors when there is a generator on site. This is actually a code change that is coming in the 2020 NEC.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sggoat View Post
      The new Genset is in and now waiting for the Co. to install the new Tx Sw They are claiming the County says the sw needs to be outside. The old sw is inside and was passed when installed in 2005. Does anyone know if the NEC was changed as far as working/access clearances since that time?(2005).
      Current code says 36" in front of the panel and a min of 30" wide, 6 feet high---of course that is only if the eq is "likely" to be serviced while energized.
      Is the old switch service rated, utility breaker inside of the trans. switch? If the new trans. switch is not service rated then they have an argument for having the service disconnect located out side but it would not matter about the switch. If the new switch is service rated then they could have an amendment for having the disconnect on the out side.
      Sure it will work.... I saw it on YouTube

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ceb58 View Post
        Is the old switch service rated, utility breaker inside of the trans. switch? If the new trans. switch is not service rated then they have an argument for having the service disconnect located out side but it would not matter about the switch. If the new switch is service rated then they could have an amendment for having the disconnect on the out side.
        The old tx sw is in a sub-panel-routed through a 70 amp brkr in the main panel. The new tx switch will be a whole house unit-RXSw200a3-with SE disconnect. Routing would be from the meter can directly into the Tx Sw disconnect. This SW is supposedly rated for damp locations---BUT this is Fla.--with horizontal rain--two of my neighbors have the same sw--they routinely fill with rain water at the bottom. This is not acceptable.
        The NEC has no limit as to in/out on these enclosures per their rating(other than the inconsistent application of the "access" dimensions) , and it most certainly could be installed inside, based on my research. I would be amazed if the County inspectors could argue that this switch would be safer mounted outside rather than inside--
        Thanks a lot for the info. Hopefully, the County inspectors will adhere to the NEC as they claim.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sggoat View Post
          The old tx sw is in a sub-panel-routed through a 70 amp brkr in the main panel. The new tx switch will be a whole house unit-RXSw200a3-with SE disconnect. Routing would be from the meter can directly into the Tx Sw disconnect. This SW is supposedly rated for damp locations---BUT this is Fla.--with horizontal rain--two of my neighbors have the same sw--they routinely fill with rain water at the bottom. This is not acceptable.
          The NEC has no limit as to in/out on these enclosures per their rating(other than the inconsistent application of the "access" dimensions) , and it most certainly could be installed inside, based on my research. I would be amazed if the County inspectors could argue that this switch would be safer mounted outside rather than inside--
          Thanks a lot for the info. Hopefully, the County inspectors will adhere to the NEC as they claim.
          If they stay strictly by the NEC then code calls for the service disconnect to be mounted at " the closest point of entry ". Its their call on what that distance is.
          Sure it will work.... I saw it on YouTube

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by sggoat View Post
            The old tx sw is in a sub-panel-routed through a 70 amp brkr in the main panel. The new tx switch will be a whole house unit-RXSw200a3-with SE disconnect. Routing would be from the meter can directly into the Tx Sw disconnect. This SW is supposedly rated for damp locations---BUT this is Fla.--with horizontal rain--two of my neighbors have the same sw--they routinely fill with rain water at the bottom. This is not acceptable.
            The NEC has no limit as to in/out on these enclosures per their rating(other than the inconsistent application of the "access" dimensions) , and it most certainly could be installed inside, based on my research. I would be amazed if the County inspectors could argue that this switch would be safer mounted outside rather than inside--
            Thanks a lot for the info. Hopefully, the County inspectors will adhere to the NEC as they claim.

            Read 312.2 in the NEC. The biggest code violation I see with NEMA 3R rated equipment is that many installers do not use the proper fittings when entering an enclosure above the level of uninsulated live parts. A PVC connector and metal locknut is listed for damp locations only, to make it listed for wet locations a Meyers hub, sealing ring, or sealing locknut have to be installed.

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